J. O. Corliss

Born: Dec. 26, 1845.
Died: September 17. 1923
—–
Three Adventist preachers, Stephen Haskell, John Corliss and Mendel Israel, a printer, Henry Scott, and an experienced door-to-door literature salesperson, William Arnold, travelled from San Francisco to Sydney on June 6, 1885.

http://www.warburtonadventists.com/signs/index.shtml
—–
Australasia

In 1874 the Lord gave to His messenger a dream, revealing the fact that this message would go to all parts of the world. At that time Australia was mentioned, but it was not until ten years later that the brethren were able to plan the penetration of that island continent. S. N. Haskell and his party of missionaries reached Australia in June of 1885. Brethren Corliss, Israel, Scott, and Arnold accompanied Elder Haskell. Although there was considerable opposition, nevertheless the cause of truth prospered. Early in the history of the work in Australia the need for institutions of their own in that field was recognized, and so the foundations were laid for what became strong and prosperous educational, publishing, medical, and health food activities.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1944-42/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=28

—–
The Friday-Morning Workers’ Meeting

But not all was well, and Ellen White sensed this from the first. From observation and from special insights divinely revealed, she understood the nature of the trouble. True, they had beautiful grounds well laid out; they had the best speakers who could be brought together; they had crowds of people exceeding in number their fondest hopes; but there were deep-seated problems not visible to the throngs on the grounds. Jealousies existed between key workers at the camp, and a spirit of criticism prevailed. Sunday night, in vision, she seemed to be laboring with them, “speaking to them under the influence of the Spirit of God, and pointing out the necessity of earnest work in our own individual cases if we would have the deep moving of the Spirit of God in our midst” (MS 41, 1894). What took place Friday morning she reported in several letters and in her diary: {4BIO 168.5}

This morning my work was in the large tent. The enemy
seemed determined that I should not bear my testimony; there
was not much vitality in the atmosphere, but I thought I would

169

try. I was so faint that I had to return to my room. I took a little
nourishment and again went to the tent, but could not remain. {4BIO 168.6}

I then felt that Satan was trying to hinder me, and I went the
third time, and the Lord gave me power to bear a decided
testimony to those assembled, especially to the ministers. Then
there was a break, and a good social meeting followed. {4BIO 169.1}

I had directed that the horse and phaeton should be ready for
me to ride after breakfast, but Willie was so anxious that I should
attend the ministers’ meeting that I did so. {4BIO 169.2}

The power of the Holy Spirit came upon me, and I gave a
decided testimony of reproof because of the lack of love and
sympathy and courtesy toward brethren in the ministry. These
feelings are positively forbidden by our Saviour. . . . {4BIO 169.3}

There is a sad dearth of real courtesy, sympathy, and tender
regard and confidence. I presented these things, and the Lord
helped me.–Letter 42, 1894. {4BIO 169.4}

Writing further of the experience, she related:

After breakfast I met with the ministers in the reception tent,
and bore them a decided testimony, addressing them by name. I
spoke to Brother A in regard to his treatment of his brother
ministers. Brother A confessed in a very tender spirit to Brother
B, and Brother B confessed that he had not had that love and
tender regard for his brethren that he should have had. . . . {4BIO 169.5}

With tears they clasped each other’s hands. The Spirit of the
Lord came into the meeting, and the hearts of all melted down.
From this time there was altogether a purer and more holy
atmosphere in our meetings.–MS 41, 1894. {4BIO 169.6}

Ellen White’s references to the meetings from day to day witness to the fruitfulness of that agonizing Friday-morning session. That afternoon she reported that “Elder Corliss spoke with great power.”–Ibid. There was an altar call, and seventy-five responded; twelve decided to be baptized. {4BIO 169.7}

—————

MR No. 1242 – Talented Speakers Needed for Camp Meetings; Business Men to Handle Financial Matters

(REPORT OF A PORTION OF A MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE CALIFORNIA MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, HELD IN THE ST. HELENA SANITARIUM LIBRARY, TUESDAY FORENOON, JULY 14, 1902. PRESENT: A. T. JONES, W. C. WHITE, A. N. LOPER, E. E. PARLIN, R. A. BUCHANAN, W. S. SADLER, L. M. BOWEN [MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE].)

EARLY IN THE MEETING ELDER SADLER STATED HIS CONVICTION THAT IT WOULD BE BEST FOR HIM TO RESIGN AS PRESIDENT OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, AND REQUESTED THAT ELDER CORLISS BE CHOSEN TO FILL THE PLACE. {17MR 50.1}

WHILE THE BOARD WERE CONSIDERING THIS PROPOSITION AND QUESTIONING THE ADVISABILITY OF IT, SISTER WHITE UNEXPECTEDLY CAME IN, ACCOMPANIED BY SISTER J. GOTZIAN. {17MR 50.2}

ELDER WHITE STATED THAT THE COMMITTEE HAD BEEN CONSIDERING MATTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, AND THAT THEY WOULD BE GLAD FOR ANY WORDS OF COUNSEL THAT SISTER WHITE MIGHT GIVE. {17MR 50.3}

Sister White asked what special points were under consideration. {17MR 50.4}

A. T. JONES: WE WERE CONSIDERING, SISTER WHITE, THE MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND DISPENSARY WORK IN SAN FRANCISCO. {17MR 50.5}

SISTER WHITE REMARKED THAT SHE HAD NOT YET BEEN GIVEN ANY DEFINITE POINT ON WHICH TO GIVE COUNSEL. AFTER A SHORT PAUSE, AND WITHOUT WAITING FOR ELDER JONES TO STATE ANY SPECIFIC POINTS, SISTER WHITE SPOKE, AS FOLLOWS: {17MR 50.6}

Mrs. E. G. White: My most recent burden has been to make known to our brethren that during the tent meeting season, those who are especially adapted

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to labor in camp meetings and other large gatherings are not to be held from these meetings by any city work or local affairs in which they may be interested. In our tent meetings we must have speakers who can make a good impression on the people. The ability of one man, however intelligent this man may be, is insufficient to meet the need. A variety of talents should be brought into these meetings. {17MR 50.7}

The medical missionary work is one important phase of the message to present before our brethren and sisters in camp meetings. Our workers should bear a united testimony in regard to this branch of the work. Their words must have the right ring, for all our people should be made familiar with the work that is to be done in this line. {17MR 51.1}

A short time ago I understood that the brethren were considering the advisability of inviting Brother Prescott to connect with the Berrien Springs school. But I have been shown that he is to give his entire time neither to editorial work nor to teaching, for over and over again the Lord has revealed to us that our people can be reached best at the camp meetings. We must have the best talent at these meetings. {17MR 51.2}

Where is Brother Corliss? {17MR 51.3}

A. T. JONES: HE HAS GONE HOME. {17MR 51.4}

Mrs. E. G. White: I thought he was not going home. {17MR 51.5}

A. T. JONES: HE WENT THIS MORNING. {17MR 51.6}

W. C. WHITE: IF YOU SAY WHAT YOU DESIRE HIM TO HEAR, A REPORT OF IT CAN BE SENT TO HIM. {17MR 51.7}

Mrs. E. G. White: From the light that I have had, I know that it would be far better for Elder Corliss and for the cause if he would not specify the exact line of work that he is to do. He should understand that we are in need of camp

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meeting laborers, and he should hold himself in readiness to be called to these meetings and to give his best thought to them. {17MR 51.8}

I do not know when our ministers will learn to let business and financial matters alone. Over and over again I have been shown that this is not the work of the ministry. They are not to be heavily burdened with the details of city work. They are to be in readiness to go to places where an interest has been awakened in the message, and especially to attend our camp meetings. They are not to hover over cities at the time when these meetings are in progress. {17MR 52.1}

Camp meetings must be multiplied. Place after place is to be entered. The interests can be divided, meetings being held in more than one place at the same time, if our men of ability are not kept hovering over the cities at the very time when they could reach many people in large tent meetings. This instruction has been repeated over and over again. {17MR 52.2}

A. T. JONES: YOU HAVE SOLVED OUR PROBLEM. YOU COULD NOT HAVE SPOKEN ON OUR SUBJECT ANY BETTER IF WE HAD TOLD YOU ALL THAT WE HAVE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THIS MORNING. {17MR 52.3}

Mrs. E. G. White: I did not know what you were considering, but this matter was presented to me only recently. I did not feel like mentioning it at the time because I thought it had been repeated so many times before that it was fully understood. {17MR 52.4}

A. T. JONES: JUST BEFORE YOU CAME IN WE WERE DISCUSSING WHETHER IT WOULD BE ADVISABLE TO ASSENT IF IT SHOULD BE SUGGESTED THAT BROTHER CORLISS BE PRESIDENT OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MEDICAL MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, WHICH HAS CHARGE OF THE MEDICAL MISSIONARY WORK IN THAT CITY. {17MR 52.5}

Mrs. E. G. White: It would not be according to the light that I have had.

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You must find businessmen to fill such positions. If you cannot find them, establish a school to train men to bear these burdens. {17MR 52.6}

A. T. JONES: THAT IS THE WAY WE WERE LOOKING AT IT–JUST AS YOUR TESTIMONY HAS INDICATED IT. {17MR 53.1}

Mrs. E. G. White: In this country there is a dearth of ministers who can labor acceptably in our large meetings. Australia, too, has very few such men. Many of the workers have left that field. {17MR 53.2}

When we have a camp meeting, the principal speakers are not to hurry back to the cities to attend to business matters connected with various lines of our work. Now is our time to give the message to the people. Over and over again I have been shown that camp meetings and open-air meetings should be held in Los Angeles and in various parts of the community round about. Good speakers should now be proclaiming the message in these places. But the work is not to be confined merely to Los Angeles and vicinity. A long line of meetings should be held in many other places. Camp meetings are to be held where the people are. {17MR 53.3}

To fasten a minister to one place by giving him the oversight of business matters connected with the work of the church, is not conducive to his spirituality; for it is not according to the Bible plan as outlined in the sixth of Acts. Study this plan, for it is approved of God. Follow the Word. {17MR 53.4}

A. T. JONES: WE WERE INCLINING IN JUST THE DIRECTION YOU HAVE SPOKEN–THAT BROTHER CORLISS SHOULD BE AT LIBERTY TO BE USED IN THE FIELD AND IN THE CAMP MEETINGS, ET CETERA, INSTEAD OF BEING FIXED THERE TO THAT LOCAL WORK AS A PRESIDING, LEADING OFFICER. {17MR 53.5}

Mrs. E. G. White: I know his constitution. From what has been presented to me over and over again, I know that for a while he will take hold of a line of work enthusiastically, but after a time he wearies of it, and should have a

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change. He is not to be held too long in any one place. He should go from place to place, speaking to new congregations. He has done very well in San Francisco, but it is not wisest to keep him over one congregation too long. He has another work to do. {17MR 53.6}

A. T. JONES: THAT IS THE WAY WE WERE LOOKING AT IT. {17MR 54.1}

Mrs. E. G. White: Such men as Elder Corliss and Elder Prescott can bear a much needed testimony in our large meetings. These men should be freed from local responsibilities in order that they may be able to attend these large gatherings. Camp meetings result in the accomplishment of but little good when the helpers are inefficient. In these meetings we must make the most of every service, presenting the various phases of the message forcibly, in order to make a good impression. We must reach the people soon. The little time yet remaining in which to work is rapidly growing shorter and still shorter. {17MR 54.2}

We should secure the best laborers for our camp meetings. These laborers should do personal work with the people. Let them meet the brethren and sisters in little companies for seasons of prayer. After the presentation of the Word in the large tent, let the minister invite those who do not understand the lesson to go into a smaller tent, where he can study the Word with them, dwelling more fully upon the points brought out in the sermon. Thus the camp meetings will be more educational in nature than they now are. {17MR 54.3}

One man is not to do all the speaking either for the old or for the young. Varied talents are to be brought into the services, one laborer speaking at one time and another at another time. Especially in the young people’s meetings one speaker should not carry the whole burden. Hearts that are closed to the words of one speaker may be touched by the entreaties of another. {17MR 54.4}

Brethren, we need to be melted over. We need to be resoldered.

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A. T. JONES: GOOD! {17MR 55.1}

W. C. WHITE: THAT IS WHAT OUR COMMITTEE NEEDS. {17MR 55.2}

A. T. JONES: WE APPRECIATE THAT. {17MR 55.3}

Mrs. E. G. White: When we are resoldered we are in touch with the Holy Spirit. If we cannot be resoldered we might just as well stop where we are. We must reach a higher standard spiritually. {17MR 55.4}

During the time when camp meetings can be held in this conference, two or three meetings in different places should be in progress at the same time. There is a time when these meetings cannot be held; but during the months when we can use the tents to advantage we are not to confine our efforts to the largest cities. We must give the warning message to the people in every place. {17MR 55.5}

Even if the outward circumstances seemingly make it difficult to hold the attention of the people, their interest must not be allowed to flag. To maintain an interest we may find it necessary to work very hard, but we should remember that God has entrusted us with a message that we must bear to the people. {17MR 55.6}

We must make more of our camp meetings. As ministers, we must teach in the Spirit, as Christ taught in the Spirit. At the time when the features of a camp meeting are the most discouraging, we should strive the most earnestly to bring in a spirit of hope and confidence in God. We are not to falter when the wheels do not seem to be moving as rapidly as Jehu’s chariot wheels moved. {17MR 55.7}

“Work out your own salvation,” we are instructed, “with fear and trembling. For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of His good pleasure.” {17MR 55.8}

Instead of choosing the work most pleasing to us, and refusing to do something that our brethren think we should do, we are to inquire, “Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?” Instead of marking out the way that natural inclination

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prompts us to follow, we are to pray, “Teach me Thy way, O Lord, and lead me in a plain path.”–Ms 104, 1902.

Ellen G. White Estate Washington, D. C. April 6, 1987. Entire Manuscript. {17MR 55.9}

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[edit] Australia
See also: Australian Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists
On May 10, 1885, eleven Americans set sail on the Australia from San Francisco with hopes to “open up a mission in Australia.”

The following people became the pioneers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific –

Pastor Stephen Haskell
Pastor Mendel Israel, accompanied by his wife and two daughters
Pastor John Corliss, accompanied by his wife and two children
Henry Scott, a printer from Pacific Press
William Arnold, an Adventist bookseller
They arrived in Sydney on June 6, 1885. While Haskell and Israel stayed in Sydney, the others went on a three day ride in a small coastal steamer to Melbourne, the city selected to be the base for the church’s Australian activities.

The first Seventh-day Adventist church in Australia was the Melbourne Seventh-day Adventist Church, which formed on January 10, 1886 with 29 members.[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Pacific_Division_of_Seventh-day_Adventists

———————–

The evangelistic series—”apologetics” and change

The story of the evangelistic camp meeting in the Melbourne suburb of Armadale in late 1895 illustrates the “apologetic” motivations behind doctrinal development and highlights clearly the kind of impact produced by the new thrust in Prescott’s preaching. Pitched in the center of a prominent middle-class suburb, not far from the city center, in full view of a major city railway line, the 65-tent encampment presented a striking novelty for the community.

As the meetings progressed, the regular congregation of two hundred camping church members was augmented during evenings and week-ends by an inquisitive public. Evangelist John Corliss and Ellen White shared in the preaching, but it was Prescott who dominated with his charisma. Undoubtedly, the professor’s legendary, richly resonant voice attracted the ears of the Aussie “colonials,” but the real attraction that drew in the crowds in ever increasing numbers was the Christ-centered content of his sermons.

http://www.sdanet.org/atissue/trinity/valentine.htm#16!

——————

Corliss, “Geologists vs. the Mosaic Record,” R&H, LV (February 19, 1880), 116-17; Ellen C. White, “Science and the Bible in Education,” The Signs of …

www.asa3.org/aSA/PSCF/1975/JASA3-75Numbers.html

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During Mrs. White’s stay in Australia, a number of women were ordained as deaconesses. The Ashfield Church, Sydney, Australia, church clerk’s minutes for August 10, 1895 read:
“Immediately following the election, the officers were called to the front where Pastors Corliss and McCaullagh set apart the elder, deacons (and) deaconesses by prayer and the laying on of hands.”

http://www.adventistwomenscenter.org/article.php?id=52

—–

At the 1919 Bible Conference, Rufus Underwood, president of the Central Union Conference, observed that Ellen White was not to be considered as equal to the canon of the Scripture. He used an experience from the 1870s as confirmation:

He along with George Butler and J. H. Morrison studied tithing from the Biblical standpoint and made a proposal at a General Conference session to adopt it. Such pioneers as Stephen Haskell and J. O. Corliss, however, argued against Underwood’s proposal. Their opposition centered upon Ellen White’s endorsement of the systematic benevolence plan for financing the ministry that had been adopted in 1859. Because of their argument, Underwood observed, biblical tithing was precluded from the Adventist Church for several years. Eventually, however, Underwood prevailed, and he observed that “the support of the gospel ministry could be clearly sustained from both the Old and New Testaments, and that the source from which we were to gather our instruction for the guidance of the church was primarily the Bible and not the Testimonies.”

As in the case of the law in Galatians, the “daily,” and in other issues of theology, Ellen White urged that the question be resolved by study of the Scriptures, not her writings.

http://www.atoday.com/magazine/1994/11/ellen-white-75-more-years-role-confusion-0

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During the summer of 1912, Canright was busy at North Park. In the letter from his son just referred to, he wrote: “I spent most of the year of 1912 in Alaska, coming home in October, I believe. My father took care of the farm while I was away and also had an addition built on to the house, and I helped finish it on my return.” At that time Mrs. Canright was not at all well. Her nephew, Howard Pierce of Otsego, told me that she was “ailing for some time” before she died of goiter and heart failure (Jan. 2, 1913). This is confirmed by her husband in the following obituary which was published in the Review and Herald on June 12, 1913 (p. 575).

“CANRIGHT. – Died, recently at Grand Rapids, Michigan, Mrs. Lucy Hadden Canright, wife of Elder D.M. Canright, of pneumonia and heart failure, aged 57 years. She had been failing for nearly a year, but neither she nor the family supposed it was anything serious. At last she was persuaded to see the family physician. All were shocked when told that she was in the last stages of heart disease, could live but a few months at the longest, and might die any day. This was kept from her, and everything possible done to make her life as pleasant as possible. She expected to be well again soon, but caught a slight cold, pneumonia set in, and six days later she died. She suffered very little, and quietly fell asleep, all her family being present. She leaves one son and two daughters, all of age, unmarried, and at home when not away teaching, also two brothers and two sisters. The remains were taken to Otsego, Michigan, her old home, and buried in the family cemetery. The funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. R.M. Scott.

“When she was a small child, her mother, with many others, embraced the Adventist faith under the preaching of Elder M.E. Cornell at Otsego, Michigan, where there had been a strong church ever since. Here Lucy grew up a Sabbath-keeper. Being an excellent organist, a good singer and an apt teacher, she was always a great help in the Sabbath-school. Later in life she was several times elected superintendent of a School.

“Mrs. Canright attended the College at Battle Creek, Michigan, where Professor Bell was teacher. In 1881 we were married by Elder James White, only a few weeks before his death. Together we visited many of the churches in Michigan, attended a series of camp-meetings in Canada, Maine, New England, New York, etc. One summer, we, with a large company, conducted tent-meetings in Worcester, Mass., and raised up a church there [in 1885]. This was the last time either of us ever saw Sister White.

“My wife was with me most of the time during my work in the church and college at Battle Creek, and thus was widely known among Sabbath-keepers. She greatly enjoyed entertaining the ministers and brethren in her own home and loved them dearly. Among these were Brother and Sister White and both their sons, Edson and W.C., also Elders Butler, Smith, Corliss and Fargo and many others. During all her life she often spoke of all these with very kindly words and tender feelings. She took little interest in doctrinal discussion, a big heart and tender sympathy for all dominating her life. She cried when circumstances separated her from these old ties, but she went with her companion, and greatly beloved by the church for her efficient and unselfish work. In my absence she conducted services in the pulpit, prayer meeting or Sabbath-school.

If any in the neighborhood were sick or poor or in sorrow, she was the first to know it, the first to be there and see that something was done. She shortened her own life by caring for others when she needed to be cared for herself. She lived a long life in a few years; but often thought she did not amount to much because not eloquent in speech nor gifted in argument. But when brethren and sisters and neighbors gathered around her casket and their tears fell on her dead face, while they said, ‘She was a mother to us all’, that told a different story. It reminded me of our Lord’s parable where He selected those to sit on His right hand who were surprised to be told that they had ever done anything. There is no mention that Jesus selected anyone because he was smart and good in debate. I felt ashamed of myself, for one, that I had not been more like my good wife. By God’s grace there shall be hereafter less sharpness and more kindness to all.

D.M. CANRIGHT”

http://www.ellenwhite.org/canright/cas12.htm

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Chap. 15 – (1894)

The Ashfield Camp Meeting in
New South Wales

Ellen White’s references to the meetings from day to day witness to the fruitfulness of that agonizing Friday-morning session. That afternoon she reported that “Elder Corliss spoke with great power.”–Ibid. There was an altar call, and seventy-five responded; twelve decided to be baptized. {4BIO 169.7}

After a second week of good meetings, the Ashfield camp meeting came to a triumphant close on Sunday with 2,500 people present. Ellen White describes the climaxing service: {4BIO 171.7}

The last public service, on Sunday evening, was one long to

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be remembered. The night was a beautiful one. The walls of the
large tent were raised, and extra seats were placed around the
outside, yet a large crowd was left standing. Elder Corliss
preached upon the glorious appearing of our Lord, and it was
just the discourse for the occasion. {4BIO 171.8}

The Spirit and power of God were manifested through the
human agent. At times the whole congregation was held as if
spellbound. Truly many had an opportunity of hearing things
strange to them. Yet these were old truths, but placed before the
hearers with freshness and power the hearers had never known
before.–DF 28a, “Experiences in Australia,” p. 789g. {4BIO 172.1}

Post-Camp Meeting Evangelistic Meetings

Interest was high when the camp meeting closed. Many requested that the services should not close, so it was decided to move the tent to another location, about a mile distant but with rail connections more convenient to several of the suburbs of Sydney. Corliss and McCullagh were commissioned to continue with meetings nightly; these were well attended. Other workers were drawn in to visit the people in their homes and conduct Bible readings (BE, Dec. 3, 1894). {4BIO 172.2}

—————

Then a man by the name of Picton, a Campbellite minister,
who was a trained debater, and according to his own opinion, a
man of intellectual superiority, challenged our people to meet
him in debate on the Sabbath question. We felt very sorry to
enter into a discussion on this matter, for generally it leaves an
excited state of feeling, but there was no evading the matter. The
man boasted that he would wipe out the Seventh-day Adventists,
and as God would be dishonored if this proud, boasting
Goliath was left to defy Israel, the terms of the debate were
agreed upon.–Letter 123, 1894. {4BIO 173.1}

The Debate on the Sabbath Question

According to the terms agreed upon, six nights would be given to the debate, beginning December 11 and closing December 19. J. O. Corliss would represent Seventh-day Adventists; Mr. Picton, the Protestant churches. Each speaker would have a half-hour to speak on each evening. There was to be no applause. The debate would take place in the Wesleyan church (BE, Dec. 17, 1894). {4BIO 173.2}

Ellen White was intensely interested in what was to take place, for when the debate was proposed she was given in vision a preview, together with potential hazards. She described Corliss as “an excellent teacher,” able to make things “very plain and interesting,” a man able to speak with “power and great clearness” (Letters 39, 1895; 130, 1894). She had been acquainted with him since his boyhood days. She knew him also to be a man of quick temper, high self-esteem, and with a proclivity to lash out at an opponent or supposed opponent. Her great concern was that he should put his full dependence on the Lord and speak with great discretion. {4BIO 173.3}

She hastened off an earnest letter warning Corliss that if he were not constantly on guard, making Christ his strength, he would reveal the natural temperament of J. O. Corliss. She urged him to keep in mind that the universe of heaven composed his audience (Letter 130, 1894). “Your only safety,” she urged, “is in joining yourself to Jesus and keeping close to His side.”–Letter 21a, 1895. {4BIO 173.4}

She recounted how Jesus met opposition with “It is written.” With a grateful heart Corliss accepted the message of caution. Much

174

time was spent in earnest prayer for God’s special blessing on his work and that truth might conquer. After the second evening of the debate Ellen White reported: {4BIO 173.5}

The Lord has used Elder Corliss. . . . He has spoken with
power and great clearness. Truth is indeed bearing away the
victory, and light is shining upon many minds.–Letter 130,
1894. {4BIO 174.1}

The debater is a clear, moderate-spoken man, but he has
arguments weak as weakness itself. I felt and still do feel that
much is at stake, depending upon the result of this debate.
–Ibid. {4BIO 174.2}

Some days later she added:

The discussion lasted six nights. Much prayer was offered to
God during this time, and the Lord manifested His special grace
and power in presentation of the truth. Error appeared
weakness; the truth, strength.–Ibid. {4BIO 174.3}

Midway in the debate the interest was such that the discussion was moved to a large hall, which was well filled every evening. The minister of the Wesleyan church and Elder McCullagh sat on the stand together with the chairman of the meeting and the two speakers in the debate. Describing Corliss’ presentation, Ellen White wrote to Edson: {4BIO 174.4}

He [Corliss] went through the discussion trusting in God, not
relying upon himself, and the truth was not dishonored in his
hands. The man stood before the people as if bathed in the bright
beams of the Sun of Righteousness. He was dignified because he
was conscious of the fact that he was the mouthpiece for God. {4BIO 174.5}

As she continued, she gave a word picture of changing attitudes on the part of the listeners: {4BIO 174.6}

As the debate continued night after night, the minds of the
majority of the people were turned in favor of the truth. There
were some who allowed prejudice to control them to such an
extent that they would not acknowledge truth even though it
was as plain as noonday. {4BIO 174.7}

Time and again the chairman had to call the meeting to order

175

as Brother Corliss showed up the inconsistency of Mr. Picton’s
arguments, for they were so delighted with the keen, cutting
truth that they could not restrain the demonstration of their
pleasure. These demonstrations on the part of the people in
behalf of the truth made the opposing party feel rather
crestfallen, and they insisted that the chairman should hold the
meeting to the rules of the debate. . . . {4BIO 174.8}

All through the debate Brother Corliss kept insisting that his
opponent should produce a text in favor of Sundaykeeping, for
the question of the debate was “Do the Scriptures teach that
Christians should observe the first day of the week as the
Sabbath day?”–Letter 123, 1894. {4BIO 175.1}

The debate ended with Elder Corliss exhorting the people, arraigning them before the judgment bar where all would be called to give an account of the way in which they had improved their opportunities and valued their privileges. So impressed was the audience with the outcome of the discussion that they could not be restrained from thunderous applause, and the chairman commented that aside from the spiritual benefits of the discussion, they had enjoyed a rare intellectual treat. {4BIO 175.2}

As she recounted the experience, Ellen White reported to Edson:

They did not take an expression of decision on the merits of
the debate; but the applause showed that their sympathies were
on the side of the truth.–Ibid. {4BIO 175.3}

And in a final word she wrote: “As a general thing, a debate kills the interest, but in this case it has not had such an effect. There is still a good attendance at the tent, and about twenty-seven persons have signed the covenant, and there are about twenty more who are keeping the Sabbath that have not yet joined the church. . . . We hope for a good church in Ashfield.” {4BIO 175.4}

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MR No. 1557 – Evangelism in Melbourne Suburbs; God’s Law Everlasting; Truth to Triumph Over Error

(Written February 16, 1894, from St. George’s Terrace, St. Kilda Road, Melbourne, to Friends in America.)

I have been wishing that I could write a letter to you and to other friends in America for this mail, but fear that I cannot write much this time. I have had many trying things in my experience since the camp meeting. My soul has been distressed and burdened. Now I feel somewhat relieved; matters are adjusting themselves more pleasantly. We are now in the heat of battle in this country. I feel to the depths of my being that now is the time to work. There are three suburbs where meetings are now in progress–Brighton, Williamstown, and Prahran. {21MR 280.1}

At North Brighton a tent is pitched and Elder Corliss and Robert Hare are working unitedly and with success. The Congregationalist minister in Brighton is a man of wide influence; he occupies a position in relation to the different churches similar to that of Crafts in America. He was the founder of the Council of Churches in this country. Several members of this church have embraced the truth and it hurt him. {21MR 280.2}

He came to the tent a few evenings since, accompanied by a large portion of his members, determined to carry out his plans. He asked [for] the privilege of speaking after Elder Corliss had spoken, but was told that this could not be permitted, for it would do no good and only create confusion. {21MR 280.3}

He insisted and said, “Will you put the matter to vote?” This was his scheme, for he had brought in his church members in order to carry the day and have things his own way. But Elder Corliss said, “No, I cannot give away this meeting.” He had stated this to him in a previous interview. Before the whole congregation Elder Corliss said, “I will give this minister the tent, free of expense, any night in the week except Sunday night, to speak the whole evening upon this subject, but I cannot permit him to divert the minds of this congregation from important points. I wish them to hear and to investigate the Scripture for themselves, that they may see if this is not the truth that I present to them.” To the minister he said, “I will give you five minutes to decide upon the evening you will appoint to speak in this tent.” The man turned very white, but answered not a word. The five minutes were a dead silence. {21MR 280.4}

Then Elder Corliss went on with his discourse, showing the fallacy of

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the minister’s position on the subject in question, which Elder Corliss had, stated in print, in his hands. After the meeting closed the minister gave out that on Wednesday evening he would answer the discourse in his own church. {21MR 280.5}

Brethren Hare and Colcord were present to hear this review. It was a repetition of the same objection that Canright had put forth in his books. The minister had Canright’s book. But the congregation were not at all satisfied. Now his own people are so thoroughly stirred up that the minister feels compelled to do something, for his reputation is at stake. He has sent a challenge to Elder Corliss to meet him in discussion and there is no way of evading this question now, for the enemies of the truth would triumph if the matter were not taken up. {21MR 281.1}

Elder Corliss feels very much troubled over it, but he has agreed to accept the challenge if the minister will consent to continue the discussion for six evenings, for one night would not be sufficient to do justice to the subject. He hopes that the proposition will be rejected, for the interest is great and is extending through all the region round about. Meanwhile he has decided to go on, pressing into his discourse all the important matter possible, and carrying the interest as far as he can before the discussion shall begin. We think the minister will not accept the conditions, for all he wants is to throw in a mass of objections to confuse the minds of the hearers; and as he has no weapons furnished him in the Bible with which to war against the truth, he must supply the great necessity from the armor of the prince of darkness–with assertions, Satan’s falsehoods prepared for him to handle, such as are presented in Canright’s book. These he can use in one evening and claim that he has extinguished the law of God and the Sabbath. But when he has to keep to the point for six evenings, the weakness of his arguments will become apparent to the people. {21MR 281.2}

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MR No. 1242 – Talented Speakers Needed for Camp Meetings; Business Men to Handle Financial Matters

(REPORT OF A PORTION OF A MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE CALIFORNIA MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, HELD IN THE ST. HELENA SANITARIUM LIBRARY, TUESDAY FORENOON, JULY 14, 1902. PRESENT: A. T. JONES, W. C. WHITE, A. N. LOPER, E. E. PARLIN, R. A. BUCHANAN, W. S. SADLER, L. M. BOWEN [MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE].)

EARLY IN THE MEETING ELDER SADLER STATED HIS CONVICTION THAT IT WOULD BE BEST FOR HIM TO RESIGN AS PRESIDENT OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, AND REQUESTED THAT ELDER CORLISS BE CHOSEN TO FILL THE PLACE. {17MR 50.1}

WHILE THE BOARD WERE CONSIDERING THIS PROPOSITION AND QUESTIONING THE ADVISABILITY OF IT, SISTER WHITE UNEXPECTEDLY CAME IN, ACCOMPANIED BY SISTER J. GOTZIAN. {17MR 50.2}

ELDER WHITE STATED THAT THE COMMITTEE HAD BEEN CONSIDERING MATTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, AND THAT THEY WOULD BE GLAD FOR ANY WORDS OF COUNSEL THAT SISTER WHITE MIGHT GIVE. {17MR 50.3}

Sister White asked what special points were under consideration. {17MR 50.4}

A. T. JONES: WE WERE CONSIDERING, SISTER WHITE, THE MEDICAL MISSIONARY AND DISPENSARY WORK IN SAN FRANCISCO. {17MR 50.5}

SISTER WHITE REMARKED THAT SHE HAD NOT YET BEEN GIVEN ANY DEFINITE POINT ON WHICH TO GIVE COUNSEL. AFTER A SHORT PAUSE, AND WITHOUT WAITING FOR ELDER JONES TO STATE ANY SPECIFIC POINTS, SISTER WHITE SPOKE, AS FOLLOWS: {17MR 50.6}

Mrs. E. G. White: My most recent burden has been to make known to our brethren that during the tent meeting season, those who are especially adapted

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to labor in camp meetings and other large gatherings are not to be held from these meetings by any city work or local affairs in which they may be interested. In our tent meetings we must have speakers who can make a good impression on the people. The ability of one man, however intelligent this man may be, is insufficient to meet the need. A variety of talents should be brought into these meetings. {17MR 50.7}

The medical missionary work is one important phase of the message to present before our brethren and sisters in camp meetings. Our workers should bear a united testimony in regard to this branch of the work. Their words must have the right ring, for all our people should be made familiar with the work that is to be done in this line. {17MR 51.1}

A short time ago I understood that the brethren were considering the advisability of inviting Brother Prescott to connect with the Berrien Springs school. But I have been shown that he is to give his entire time neither to editorial work nor to teaching, for over and over again the Lord has revealed to us that our people can be reached best at the camp meetings. We must have the best talent at these meetings. {17MR 51.2}

Where is Brother Corliss? {17MR 51.3}

A. T. JONES: HE HAS GONE HOME. {17MR 51.4}

Mrs. E. G. White: I thought he was not going home. {17MR 51.5}

A. T. JONES: HE WENT THIS MORNING. {17MR 51.6}

W. C. WHITE: IF YOU SAY WHAT YOU DESIRE HIM TO HEAR, A REPORT OF IT CAN BE SENT TO HIM. {17MR 51.7}

Mrs. E. G. White: From the light that I have had, I know that it would be far better for Elder Corliss and for the cause if he would not specify the exact line of work that he is to do. He should understand that we are in need of camp

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meeting laborers, and he should hold himself in readiness to be called to these meetings and to give his best thought to them. {17MR 51.8}

I do not know when our ministers will learn to let business and financial matters alone. Over and over again I have been shown that this is not the work of the ministry. They are not to be heavily burdened with the details of city work. They are to be in readiness to go to places where an interest has been awakened in the message, and especially to attend our camp meetings. They are not to hover over cities at the time when these meetings are in progress. {17MR 52.1}

Camp meetings must be multiplied. Place after place is to be entered. The interests can be divided, meetings being held in more than one place at the same time, if our men of ability are not kept hovering over the cities at the very time when they could reach many people in large tent meetings. This instruction has been repeated over and over again. {17MR 52.2}

A. T. JONES: YOU HAVE SOLVED OUR PROBLEM. YOU COULD NOT HAVE SPOKEN ON OUR SUBJECT ANY BETTER IF WE HAD TOLD YOU ALL THAT WE HAVE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THIS MORNING. {17MR 52.3}

Mrs. E. G. White: I did not know what you were considering, but this matter was presented to me only recently. I did not feel like mentioning it at the time because I thought it had been repeated so many times before that it was fully understood. {17MR 52.4}

A. T. JONES: JUST BEFORE YOU CAME IN WE WERE DISCUSSING WHETHER IT WOULD BE ADVISABLE TO ASSENT IF IT SHOULD BE SUGGESTED THAT BROTHER CORLISS BE PRESIDENT OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MEDICAL MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, WHICH HAS CHARGE OF THE MEDICAL MISSIONARY WORK IN THAT CITY. {17MR 52.5}

Mrs. E. G. White: It would not be according to the light that I have had.

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You must find businessmen to fill such positions. If you cannot find them, establish a school to train men to bear these burdens. {17MR 52.6}

A. T. JONES: THAT IS THE WAY WE WERE LOOKING AT IT–JUST AS YOUR TESTIMONY HAS INDICATED IT. {17MR 53.1}

Mrs. E. G. White: In this country there is a dearth of ministers who can labor acceptably in our large meetings. Australia, too, has very few such men. Many of the workers have left that field. {17MR 53.2}

When we have a camp meeting, the principal speakers are not to hurry back to the cities to attend to business matters connected with various lines of our work. Now is our time to give the message to the people. Over and over again I have been shown that camp meetings and open-air meetings should be held in Los Angeles and in various parts of the community round about. Good speakers should now be proclaiming the message in these places. But the work is not to be confined merely to Los Angeles and vicinity. A long line of meetings should be held in many other places. Camp meetings are to be held where the people are. {17MR 53.3}

To fasten a minister to one place by giving him the oversight of business matters connected with the work of the church, is not conducive to his spirituality; for it is not according to the Bible plan as outlined in the sixth of Acts. Study this plan, for it is approved of God. Follow the Word. {17MR 53.4}

A. T. JONES: WE WERE INCLINING IN JUST THE DIRECTION YOU HAVE SPOKEN–THAT BROTHER CORLISS SHOULD BE AT LIBERTY TO BE USED IN THE FIELD AND IN THE CAMP MEETINGS, ET CETERA, INSTEAD OF BEING FIXED THERE TO THAT LOCAL WORK AS A PRESIDING, LEADING OFFICER. {17MR 53.5}

Mrs. E. G. White: I know his constitution. From what has been presented to me over and over again, I know that for a while he will take hold of a line of work enthusiastically, but after a time he wearies of it, and should have a

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change. He is not to be held too long in any one place. He should go from place to place, speaking to new congregations. He has done very well in San Francisco, but it is not wisest to keep him over one congregation too long. He has another work to do. {17MR 53.6}

A. T. JONES: THAT IS THE WAY WE WERE LOOKING AT IT. {17MR 54.1}

Mrs. E. G. White: Such men as Elder Corliss and Elder Prescott can bear a much needed testimony in our large meetings. These men should be freed from local responsibilities in order that they may be able to attend these large gatherings. Camp meetings result in the accomplishment of but little good when the helpers are inefficient. In these meetings we must make the most of every service, presenting the various phases of the message forcibly, in order to make a good impression. We must reach the people soon. The little time yet remaining in which to work is rapidly growing shorter and still shorter. {17MR 54.2}

We should secure the best laborers for our camp meetings. These laborers should do personal work with the people. Let them meet the brethren and sisters in little companies for seasons of prayer. After the presentation of the Word in the large tent, let the minister invite those who do not understand the lesson to go into a smaller tent, where he can study the Word with them, dwelling more fully upon the points brought out in the sermon. Thus the camp meetings will be more educational in nature than they now are. {17MR 54.3}

One man is not to do all the speaking either for the old or for the young. Varied talents are to be brought into the services, one laborer speaking at one time and another at another time. Especially in the young people’s meetings one speaker should not carry the whole burden. Hearts that are closed to the words of one speaker may be touched by the entreaties of another. {17MR 54.4}

Brethren, we need to be melted over. We need to be resoldered.

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A. T. JONES: GOOD! {17MR 55.1}

W. C. WHITE: THAT IS WHAT OUR COMMITTEE NEEDS. {17MR 55.2}

A. T. JONES: WE APPRECIATE THAT. {17MR 55.3}

Mrs. E. G. White: When we are resoldered we are in touch with the Holy Spirit. If we cannot be resoldered we might just as well stop where we are. We must reach a higher standard spiritually. {17MR 55.4}

During the time when camp meetings can be held in this conference, two or three meetings in different places should be in progress at the same time. There is a time when these meetings cannot be held; but during the months when we can use the tents to advantage we are not to confine our efforts to the largest cities. We must give the warning message to the people in every place. {17MR 55.5}

Even if the outward circumstances seemingly make it difficult to hold the attention of the people, their interest must not be allowed to flag. To maintain an interest we may find it necessary to work very hard, but we should remember that God has entrusted us with a message that we must bear to the people. {17MR 55.6}

We must make more of our camp meetings. As ministers, we must teach in the Spirit, as Christ taught in the Spirit. At the time when the features of a camp meeting are the most discouraging, we should strive the most earnestly to bring in a spirit of hope and confidence in God. We are not to falter when the wheels do not seem to be moving as rapidly as Jehu’s chariot wheels moved. {17MR 55.7}

“Work out your own salvation,” we are instructed, “with fear and trembling. For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of His good pleasure.” {17MR 55.8}

Instead of choosing the work most pleasing to us, and refusing to do something that our brethren think we should do, we are to inquire, “Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?” Instead of marking out the way that natural inclination

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prompts us to follow, we are to pray, “Teach me Thy way, O Lord, and lead me in a plain path.”–Ms 104, 1902.

Ellen G. White Estate Washington, D. C. April 6, 1987. Entire Manuscript. {17MR 55.9}

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MR No. 536 – Debating and the Ministry

I was led from room to room occupied by our brethren at that meeting [the 1888 G.C. Session at Minneapolis], and heard that of which every one will one day be terribly ashamed, if it is not until the judgment, when every work will appear in its true light. In the room occupied by you there was a Witness, and in the rooms of others there was a Witness to every remark made, –the ungodly jest, the satire, the sarcasm, the wit; the Lord God of heaven was displeased with you, and with every one who shared in the merriment, and in the hard, unimpressible spirit. An influence was exerted that was Satanic. Some souls will be lost in consequence.–Letter 61, 1893, pp. 3, 4. (To Elder I. D. Van Horn, January 20, 1893.) {8MR 23.1}

The enemies of the truth know that they have not strong arguments to sustain their position; therefore they will try the mettle of the one who presents the truth. In the position where you are placed to vindicate the truth, keep self out of sight, make no boast of knowledge, place your feet upon the Word, the eternal Word of truth. Make no reference to any sly thrusts of your opponent. Do not manifest a spirit of retaliation. But ever maintain the gentleness of Christ. Put on Christ. Your physical infirmities urge you to hasty feelings and hasty words, which give your opponent an advantage. Abide in Christ. For the truth’s sake, for Christ’s sake, preserve the dignity, the elevated and ennobling character of the truth. Your zeal will need to be controlled by the Holy Spirit of God, lest it quicken into impatience as you see the Scriptures wrested and fables and human assertions

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presented as truth. Men who know that they have the truth can have power only as they present the truth as it is in Jesus. . . . {8MR 23.2}

Dwell as little as possible upon your opponents’ objections, but press in the truth, new and convincing, arguments to cut away and undermine error. Keep your own spirit ever calm, even against personal abuse. Never retaliate. Let the spirit of kindness, Christian courtesy, rule your every action. The Holy Spirit will help your infirmities. People will pass judgment upon the men. Those in error have learned that their strength is to maintain self-control, while the fires of hell may be stirring every fiber of the being. {8MR 24.1}

Your opponent will say words which will irritate a sensitive mind. Pass these by unheeded. Do not once forget that you are speaking for God’s truth. Your spirit, if kept gentle under provocation, will speak louder than any force of argument. Do not imperil the truth by an unwise word. Remember how, when provoked, Moses once spoke unadvisedly, and dishonored God. You need larger experience as a student in the school of Christ, in copying His meekness and lowliness.–Letter 9a, 1894, pp. 2, 4. (To Elder J. O. Corliss, December 8, 1894.) {8MR 24.2}

We are praying for you that the Lord may give you largely of His Holy Spirit, and that as His human agent you may represent the likeness of Christ’s character, by manifesting the practical power of the truth in the manner in which you treat your opponent. Give him not the least semblance of an excuse to become irritated over any personal thrusts that may be given in the debate. On this occasion you are representing the Author of truth. You

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are to show that the truth is sacred, and not to be made a scourge to those who oppose it. In handling the words of the infinite God, you are not to manifest a sharp, cruel spirit. The Lord will be your teacher and enable you to carry the controversy through with Christ-like dignity. Your opponent will seek to make the truth appear unimportant, but to many he will not be successful in this design. You are Christ’s instrumentality, and should clothe your words with sacred, reverential dignity. This attitude will not be without effect on human minds.–Letter 113, 1894, pp. 2, 3. (To Elder J. O. Corliss, December 16, 1894.) {8MR 24.3}

They [J. O. Corliss’s opponents] were resolved at all hazards to stir you up, and make capital of your hastily uttered words; for they wanted to find occasion against you. The desire on their part for a discussion was not a desire to obtain light, but to evade the light and to confuse those who were ignorant of the Scriptures.–Letter 21a, 1895, p. 2. (To Elder J. O. Corliss, August 20, 1895.) {8MR 25.1}

Unless we know that we have a commission from on high, we are to refuse to enter into controversy with any one, because this is not our work.–Letter 96, 1900, pp. 1, 2. (To Elder and Mrs. S. N. Haskell, July 5, 1900.)

Released May 20, 1977. {8MR 25.2}

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MR No. 1306 – Workers Not to Disparage One Another; to Set a Right Example; Health Reform Important; Counsel on Public Speaking

(Written March 30, 1896, at “Sunnyside,” Cooranbong, NSW, to Brother and Sister McCullagh.) {18MR 42.1}

I have been glad to receive encouraging letters from you. I am anxious that in every respect both of you shall meet the approval of God. Bear in mind that in every place which you may visit, your influence needs to be strictly guarded. {18MR 42.2}

From the light which God has given me, I see that you need to feel a pure, unselfish interest in your work. Unknown to yourselves, you have exerted an influence which has had a tendency to demerit your fellow laborers. Your words have created disaffection in the churches which you have visited, and you have given the impression that your ability was not appreciated. {18MR 42.3}

By mentioning little things which others have done or said, by talking of that which was born of your own imaginings, you have cast suspicion upon others and gathered sympathy to yourselves. Your course of action should have been different from this; for seeds of this kind soon render your labor useless, and deprive the churches of the help which they should receive from the one who is appointed by the Lord to work among them. {18MR 42.4}

The Lord has given you talents for His service, and He longs to see you reveal Him to others. You have an influence with people; your speaking is acceptable to them. But you need to give more time and more earnest study to the Bible. I have been shown that you have done too much preaching and have

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given too little time to the study of the Word of God, which alone can make you an able and efficient workman. In your speaking you too often wander from the subject, not giving necessary clearness to a few vital points. {18MR 42.5}

When you thus rapidly advance, touching here and there, not every thought stands out clearly and distinctly. Before your hearers can see the thought which is of essential importance, you pass on to something else. Because of this sufficient force is not given to each point. The power that would rivet the thoughts in the mind is wanting, and your hearers cannot carry away with them all that they might were the subject presented differently. They do not realize that they have heard the word of God, not the word of man. {18MR 43.1}

You need to gather every ray of light that you can find upon the essential points of truth, and then when you are speaking, make the most of these points. Give them all the force you can by presenting them in a clear, concise manner, fastening down the evidence on these points like a nail in a sure place. Make a straight, clear application, and then call for a decision. {18MR 43.2}

It is upon this point that Brother Starr makes a decided mistake. You have noticed this error in him, and remarked upon it, but you yourself have needed to reform. I hoped that you would improve the opportunity given the workers in Sydney to learn of these things, that you might present the evidences of our faith in a clear, connected manner, and also teach others to do this. You could have learned many valuable lessons from Elder Corliss on this point. {18MR 43.3}

Elder Corliss is a man of power. He has a clear conception of vital truth, and has an influence over others. He was grieved that you did not receive the help in the study of the Bible that he thought you needed. He erred in feeling hurt that you did not manifest a deeper interest in the study of the Word of

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God that was conducted in Sydney; but you erred also in withdrawing yourself from needed help. The Lord has not given you, or any other brother or sister, liberty to withdraw from the help and knowledge which Elder Corliss’s long experience would have given you. You cannot be his judge; for you are finite, and cannot read the hearts of men. {18MR 43.4}

I am sorry that Elder Corliss, by his impetuous spirit has weakened his influence with you and others. But this has not weakened his influence with me. I know that this hastiness of temper is his infirmity. He will always have to guard against this failing. But I rejoice to think that he has made such good use of the time and ability which God has given him. Had Elder Corliss made a tirade against me, whom he calls “Mother,” I should have felt sorry because of the injury done to himself and to the cause of God; but I would not have turned away from him. He loves the truth, and the Lord loves him. {18MR 44.1}

After these outbursts he feels sorry enough, and at such times he needs the grace of the Lord and the help of his brethren, that he may make decided efforts to overcome. “Grudge not one against another, brethren, lest ye be condemned; behold the judge standeth before the door.” “Elias was a man subject to like passions as we are, and he prayed earnestly that it might not rain; and it rained not on the earth by the space of three years and six months” [James 5:9, 17]. {18MR 44.2}

There is danger that much will be made of the supposed mistakes of Elder Corliss during the progress of the work in Sydney, and that this will be given as a reason for the failure of this effort. But if this is done, it will be doing Elder Corliss great injustice, for it is not true.

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The hearts and minds of all the workers in Sydney needed to be purified, for the spirit evidenced by them grieved the Holy Spirit of God. Some were covetous, they desired promotion, they sought to be first; they were too ready to accuse their brethren of making mistakes, attributing the failure of the work to these mistakes. But God would have His workers lay down the burden of upholding and sustaining themselves lest they be not properly esteemed. Let them put their trust in the Lord God of Israel. He will keep them by His power, enabling them to do their appointed work acceptably. {18MR 45.1}

All who are laborers together with God should regard the salvation of souls as their highest interest. Self must be hid in Christ. The conversation should not take a pitying, self-righteous turn, for when this is done, Christ is eclipsed and self is made prominent. We interpose ourselves between Christ and those whose Christian experience is weak and who need help in many lines. Under this influence, those whom we try to help will in their turn exert a wrong influence, and will hinder the spiritual advancement of other souls. {18MR 45.2}

My brother, the Lord loves you, and I am aroused at two o’clock in the morning to write you these things which force themselves upon my mind. By your own choice you may place yourself under influences which will help you to form a character for the kingdom of God and make your work acceptable, or you may receive into your life that which will make your work a failure. {18MR 45.3}

It is of the greatest importance that ministers and workers set a right example. If they hold and practice lax, loose principles, their example is quoted by those who love to talk rather than to practice, as a full vindication of their course of action. Every mistake that is made grieves the heart of Jesus and does injury to the influence of the truth, which is the power of God

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for the salvation of souls. The whole synagogue of Satan watches for mistakes in the lives of those who are seeking to represent Christ, and the most is made of every defection. {18MR 45.4}

Take heed lest by your example you place other souls in peril. It is a terrible thing to lose our own souls, but to pursue a course which will cause the loss of other souls, is still more terrible. That our influence should result in being a savor of death unto death is a terrible thought, and yet it is possible. With what holy jealousy, then, should we keep guard over our thoughts, our words, our habits, our dispositions, and our characters. God requires more deep personal holiness on our part. Only by revealing His character can we cooperate with Him in the work of saving souls. {18MR 46.1}

The Lord’s workers cannot be too careful that their actions do not contradict their words, for a consistent life alone can command respect. If our practice harmonizes with our teaching, our words will have effect; but a piety which is not based upon conscientious principles is as salt without a savor. To speak and do not, is as sounding brass and a tinkling cymbal. It is of no use for us to strive to inculcate principles which we do not conscientiously practice. {18MR 46.2}

Watch unto prayer. In this way alone can you put your whole being into the Lord’s work. Self must be put in the background. Those who make self prominent gain an education that soon becomes second nature to them, and they will soon fail to realize that instead of uplifting Jesus, they uplift themselves; instead of being channels through which the living water can flow to refresh others, they absorb the sympathies and affection of those around them. This is not loyalty to our crucified Lord.

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We are ambassadors for Christ, and we are to live not to save our reputation but to save perishing souls from perdition. Our daily endeavor should be to show them how they may gain truth and righteousness. Instead of trying to elicit sympathy for ourselves by giving others the impression that we are not appreciated, we are to forget self entirely, and if we fail to do this, through want of spiritual discernment and vital piety, God will require at our hands the souls of those for whom we should have labored. He has made provision that every worker is His service may have grace and wisdom, that they may become living epistles, known and read of all men. {18MR 47.1}

By watchfulness and prayer we may accomplish just what the Lord designs that we shall. By faithful, painstaking discharge of our duty, by watching for souls as they that must give account, we may remove every stumbling block out of the way of others. By earnest warnings and entreaties, with our own souls drawn out in tender solicitude for those that are ready to perish, we may win souls to Christ. {18MR 47.2}

I would that all my brethren and sisters would remember that it is a serious thing to grieve the Holy Spirit; and it is grieved when the human agent seeks to work himself, and refuses to enter the service of the Lord because the cross is too heavy or the self-denial too great. The Holy Spirit seeks to abide in each soul. If it is welcomed as an honored guest, those who receive it will be made complete in Christ; the good work begun will be finished; and holy thoughts, heavenly affections, and Christlike actions will take the place of impure thoughts perverse sentiments, and rebellious acts. {18MR 47.3}

The Holy Spirit is a divine Teacher. If we will heed its lessons, we shall become wise unto salvation. But we need to guard well our hearts, far too often

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we forget the heavenly instruction we have received, and seek to act out the natural inclinations of our unconsecrated minds. Each one must fight his own battle against self. Heed the teachings of the Holy Spirit. If this is done, they will be repeated again and again until the impressions are as it were lead on the rock forever. {18MR 47.4}

God has bought us, and He claims a throne in each heart. Our minds and bodies must be subordinated to Him; and the natural habits and appetites must be made subservient to the higher wants of the soul. But we can place no dependence upon ourselves in this work. We cannot with safety follow our own guidance. The Holy Spirit must renew and sanctify us. And in God’s service there must be no halfway work. Those who profess to serve God and yet indulge their natural impulses will mislead other souls. Said Christ, “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength.” “This do, and thou shalt live.” {18MR 48.1}

“Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run that ye may obtain. And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown, but we an incorruptible. I therefore so run, not as uncertainly; so fight I, not as one that beateth the air: but I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection; lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway.” {18MR 48.2}

The Lord has given His people a message in regard to health reform. This light has been shining upon their pathway for thirty years, and the Lord cannot sustain His servants in a course which will counteract it. He is displeased when His servants act in opposition to the message upon this point, which He has

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given them to give to others. Can He be pleased when half the workers laboring in a place teach that the principles of health reform are as closely allied with the third angel’s message as the arm is to the body, while their co-workers, by their practice, teach principles that are entirely opposite? This is regarded as sin in the sight of God, and is one reason why He could not give greater success to the work in Sydney. {18MR 48.3}

My brother, you must no longer disparage the messengers and the message God has sent you in regard to the principles of healthful living. Testimony after testimony has been given which should have brought about great reforms, but at home and abroad your life has been a decided witness against the warnings which the Lord has sent. And nothing brings such discouragement upon the Lord’s watchmen as to be connected with those who have mental capacity, and who understand the reasons of our faith, but by precept and example manifest indifference to moral obligations. {18MR 49.1}

The light which God has given upon health reform cannot be trifled with without injury to those who attempt it; and no man can hope to succeed in the work of God while by precept and example he acts in opposition to the light which God has sent. The voice of duty is the voice of God, an inborn, heaven-sent guide; and the Lord will not be trifled with upon these subjects. He who disregards the light which God has given in regard to the preservation of health revolts against his own good, and refuses to obey the One who is working for his best good. {18MR 49.2}

It is the duty of every Christian to follow that course of action which the Lord has designated as right for His servants. He is ever to remember that God and eternity are before him, and he should not disregard his spiritual and

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physical health even though tempted by wife, children, or relatives to do so. “If the Lord be God, follow Him; but if Baal, then follow him.” {18MR 49.3}

The principles of health reform, right or wrong, which are adopted by him who gives the Word of God to others, will have a molding influence upon his work, and upon those with whom he labors. If his principles are wrong, he can and will misrepresent the truth to others. If he accepts the truth which appeals to reason rather than to perverted appetite, his influence for the right will be decided. The truth will be in his heart as a well of water, springing up into everlasting life. {18MR 50.1}

God’s instruction is not “Yea and Nay,” but “Yea and Amen” in Christ Jesus, and His workers are called upon to remember that they cannot drift along with unsettled principles which are warped and distorted by impulse, without misrepresenting the truth which they profess, and doing a lasting injury to their own souls. {18MR 50.2}

My brother and sister, if you would be a savor of life unto life, it is essential that a change be made in your experience and in the experience of your child. Sister McCullagh’s management in the home has not pleased the Lord; your daughter has not had proper training; she has not been brought up with the careful restraint that God requires. In the home and in the world the Lord God must occupy the first place. God must be enthroned in each heart. Every rival influence, be it husband, wife, or child, which would take the homage which rightly belongs to Him, must be given up. There must be no mismanagement on the part of the mother in the training of the child, for this example will do injury to other mothers and children.

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Every true servant of God will guard closely the citadel of the soul, lest the things of earth steal his affections from God. God lays no burden upon His servants that they are not able to bear. “He knoweth our frame; He remembereth that we are dust.” “In the Lord Jehovah is everlasting strength,” and this strength he waits to bestow upon every asking soul. {18MR 51.1}

It is a very easy thing to talk of the truth with the lips; but if the heart is not true and loyal to God and His requirements, our preaching does no good. This is Sister McCullagh’s danger. She draws nigh to God with her lips, but her heart is far from Him. While professing the truth, she does not practice it. And her influence has done more to darken the mind and experience of Brother McCullagh than all other influences combined. {18MR 51.2}

My brother, set your own home in order. If this is not done, you will be more trammeled by the wrong influence felt there than by any other power that can be brought against you. Day by day you are both determining what your soul shall live upon. Will you eat the flesh and drink the blood of the Son of God, which is His Word, or will you allow your future to be piloted by influences which are opposed to the truth of God, because the wishes of your natural heart are contrary to the principles given by God to His people? {18MR 51.3}

From the light which was given me while in New Zealand, I must advise you to find a home for your wife and child where they may stay while you go out and labor among the people. It is not best that they accompany you where God may call you, for they do not add to your influence, but rather detract from it. {18MR 51.4}

As soon as you decide where you wish to go, I will renew the offer which I made to you when you were in Cooranbong. I will help you to get a little home of your own, where your wife and child can be pleasantly located. They can have

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a cow, some chickens, and a garden. This would not only be a blessing to them but to you; for you would have a place to which you could go when tired, where you could obtain rest and physical exercise. If this is done, your life may be long spared to do the work of the Lord. {18MR 51.5}

I have written many things to you, but have withheld them, knowing that you were not in a condition to hear them. But I fear that you will never be where the Holy Spirit desires you should be unless you receive the testimony which the Lord has given you. {18MR 52.1}

God would have you pure and free and happy. Put self out of sight, and keep the glory of God in view. Depend on God for enlightenment in regard to your spiritual growth. Do not neglect to look to Jesus, who is seeking to mold and fashion you after His image. If you will consent, He will lead you on till at length you reach perfection. He will renew you more and more till you are complete in Him. Never depart from your Leader. He alone can lead you in safe paths. He alone can heal all your wounds. In every time of need He will give you comfort and consolation. Will you trust in Him? {18MR 52.2}

But if the Lord gives you success in winning souls to Him, never entertain the idea that your own hand has gotten you the victory. Give the praise and honor and glory to Him. And while you may speak the word of God with all fervor to the people, laboring for Christ’s sake to save perishing souls, do not forget that you are to take care of yourself. Do not injure your vocal organs by rapid speaking. Educate yourself to speak slowly, using the abdominal muscles. Do not pitch your voice in a high key; for this strains the throat, and the Lord desires that you shall preserve your vocal organs.

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I know, Brother McCullagh, that you have a very sensitive spirit. These plainly spoken words may displease you, but I offer no apology, for I have only done my duty in laying the truth before you. I write them in the fear of the Lord because I love you both. I have a deep interest in you, not because I think you are perfect, but because the Lord loves you and longs to see you revealing Him to the world. {18MR 53.1}

Think me not your enemy because I tell you the truth; let not the words I have written discourage you, but let them restore, strengthen, and uphold you. I respect and love you both, and for this reason I entreat you to heed the message God has given me for you. Do not lightly esteem the voice of the Holy Spirit. God wants you to have liberty in Him, and by placing yourself in His hands you may abound in every good work, and represent Him to the world. {18MR 53.2}

In much love, E. G. White.–Letter 67, 1896.

Ellen G. White Estate Washington, D. C. Nov. 5, 1987. Entire Letter. {18MR 53.3}

———–

MR No. 1240 – Week of Prayer in San Francisco; Visit to an SDA Vegetarian Restaurant

Friday, December 21, [1900], I left St. Helena for San Francisco, where I was to spend the Week of Prayer. I was taken to the home of Dr. Mattner, where I was made every comfortable. {17MR 38.1}

On Sabbath morning I went to the church, intending to speak. I found two stoves in the meeting room, one on either side midway between the door and the pulpit. Fires were burning in each of these. Sabbath school had just been held in the room, and, owing to the imperfect ventilation, the atmosphere was very impure. I felt the effect of this as soon as I entered. My heart began to pain. I could not breathe freely and I knew that exhaustion was coming over me. {17MR 38.2}

I said to Elder Corliss, “I know that I cannot speak this morning.” He was greatly disappointed, and asked me if I would venture to speak in the afternoon. I said that I thought I could, and, as nothing had been said before about an afternoon meeting, he put the question to the people. They unanimously decided to have a meeting. {17MR 38.3}

I would have left the church then, but I thought Sara had gone, so I sat down in a chair in the stand. I pressed close behind the organ, fearing that I might fall from my chair and create a sensation. I did not attempt to walk out by myself, for I feared that I could not do it. Presently a hand was laid on my shoulder, and Sara said, How is it, Mother?” I cannot describe the relief that came to me to know that Sara was there. She helped me into the open air, and immediately I felt better. {17MR 38.4}

I lay down as soon as I could get to my room, and while I rested I asked

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the Lord to give me strength for the afternoon. He heard my prayer, and helped me to stand before the people, though I was so weak that I had to cling to the pulpit with both hands to steady myself. I asked the people to pray for me, and I would do my best. The Lord was with me, and I had great freedom in speaking from Revelation 2:1-5: [quoted]. {17MR 38.5}

The deep moving of the Spirit of God came upon me, and the people were deeply impressed. After I had finished speaking, Elder Corliss invited all those who desired to give themselves to the Lord to come forward. A large number responded, among them a young man who is a Catholic. Prayer was offered for these precious souls. Several who came forward were in the valley of decision. May the Lord strengthen the good impression made upon their minds, and may they give themselves wholly to the Lord, is my prayer. Oh, how I long to see souls converted, singing a new song, even praise to God’s name. {17MR 39.1}

On Sunday afternoon, I spoke to a large and intelligent audience. Many of those present were outsiders. My strength was renewed, and I was able to stand without help before the people. The Lord’s blessing rested upon me, and increased strength came to me as I spoke. As on Sabbath, those seeking spiritual help were invited to come forward, and we were glad to see the ready response. I united with Elder Corliss in prayer, and the blessing of the Lord came to me in a special manner. I felt so greatly strengthened that after the meeting I walked to the place where I was staying, a distance of five blocks. {17MR 39.2}

Notice was given that I would speak again on Monday afternoon. We found a large company assembled in the church. I presented, verse by verse, part of the second chapter of Colossians. I have read this chapter many times, but it never seemed so impressive and encouraging as on this occasion. Please read this chapter prayerfully and carefully, and the Lord give you understanding. It is a

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treasure house of encouragement to the believer. {17MR 39.3}

I urged all to receive the rich promises of God, which are so full, so abundant, and so assuring. I dwelt upon the folly of turning from Christ to humanity for help. When Jesus is appreciated we shall see the salvation of God; but when we treat the Saviour indifferently, closing the door against the divine Helper, and look to man for guidance, how can we expect to have power? I tried to show my hearers what Christ is to us, and what we may be to Him as His helping hand. {17MR 40.1}

“As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in Him: rooted and built up in Him, and established in the faith, as ye have been taught, abounding therein with thanksgiving.” This work has been neglected. If the heart were filled with gratitude, its precious treasure of love and thanksgiving would flow forth to refresh others. Little grievances would not be noticed. Larger difficulties would be met in the spirit of Christ. The heart would go out in prayer to God for patience, perseverance, and forbearance. Then when the enemy came in like a flood, the Spirit of the Lord would lift up a standard for tried, tempted souls. {17MR 40.2}

We are warned, “Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ. For in Him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily.” {17MR 40.3}

God says, “Ye shall seek Me, and find Me, when ye shall search for Me with all your heart” [Jer. 29:13]. There is altogether too little courtesy and reverence shown to God. Those who are serving under the blood-stained banner of Prince Emmanuel, who have on their side the heavenly host, should give to the world a bright evidence of the saving power of truth. “Let your loins be girded about, and your lights burning; and ye yourselves like unto men that wait

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for their lord, when he will return from the wedding; that when he cometh and knocketh, they may open unto him immediately” [Luke 12:35, 36]. {17MR 40.4}

Now, just now, in this day of preparation, may the Lord awaken His people to a true sense of their responsibility. We should have ever-increasing faith and joy in the Lord. Our joy should be proportionate to the greatness of the truth which we claim to believe. {17MR 41.1}

I made an earnest appeal to the people to give to the world a correct representation of the great work before us. I urged them not to mar their faith by accepting errors. We may be complete in Him who is the head of all principalities and powers. {17MR 41.2}

The Lord gave special victory. The countenances of those present expressed their desire to advance in grace and in the knowledge of the truth. {17MR 41.3}

We have every reason to believe that the work carried on in San Francisco by Brother Corliss and his brethren is the work that needs to be done. San Francisco is a center, and must be thoroughly worked. A much more extensive work should be done in this great and wicked city. The message of mercy must be proclaimed in the highways and hedges. All classes must be invited to the banquet provided by the Lord. {17MR 41.4}

On Tuesday Brother Pierson drove us to Strawberry Hill, explaining many things of interest along the way as we wound up the ascending grade. Here there are large parks, to which the people can come from the bustle of the city. This is a blessing which all classes are free to enjoy, the poor as well as the wealthy. Here they can see trees and plants and shrubs from every clime, with roses and lilies and pinks and many other flowers. All are free to enjoy these things, but none are permitted to pick the flowers. Should they do this, the beauty of the scenery would soon be no more.

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I could but be thankful that we had visited this place at a time when the park was not filled with men smoking pipes and cigars and cigarettes. As it was, the few men who were there marred the beauty of the place by smoking, testifying to the curse of being under a vile habit. Tobacco is a slow, but sure poison, which destroys the nerve brain power, rendering the user unable to discriminate between good and evil, righteousness and sin. I thought, Oh, how I wish they knew what harm they are doing to themselves by using tobacco, while at the same time they poison the Lord’s free atmosphere, so that others are injured. {17MR 42.1}

From the park we went to our vegetarian restaurant in San Francisco, where we received an invitation to take dinner. Here we found in a narrow building tables set to accommodate as many as possible; but many who desired to come in were obliged to turn away. The plain, simple food placed before the guests was fully in accordance with the sign placed in the only window in the room–Vegetarian Restaurant. There was on the table not a particle of meat, poultry, or anything that has animal life, and yet everything was palatable and acceptable. Our party enjoyed the wholesome, substantial food. The neat appearance of the waitresses, with their dark dresses covered with white aprons, was very pleasant. {17MR 42.2}

We were very much pleased with our visit to this restaurant. We are glad that an effort is being made to provide those who wish to change their diet with food which is wholesome, nourishing, and palatable. The only things that I regretted on this occasion was the inability of the managers to accommodate many of those who wished to patronize the restaurant. If more of these restaurants could be carried on in San Francisco, what a blessing it would be. By the practical demonstration of how to prepare wholesome, palatable food without the

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use of meat, many would learn valuable lessons. They would become acquainted with health principles. {17MR 42.3}

I wish that some of those who have means tied up in banks could be led to study the situation and devise means whereby this restaurant could be enlarged, so that it will accommodate more people. It would be a school to our people, who need to learn how to prepare food without using the flesh of dead animals. That which is dead should ever be regarded as unfit for food. We shun the dead bodies of animals, because they are repulsive to us, while at the same time we prepare their flesh for our tables. There is no good reason for our doing this. We should learn that fruits, grains, and vegetables can be so skillfully and tastefully prepared that they will be chosen before any preparation of meat. {17MR 43.1}

After dinner we went to the church, where we found a goodly number of people assembled, notwithstanding the fact that it was Christmas day. We praised the Lord that so many were desirous of hearing the truth. I continued my remarks on the second chapter of Colossians, and the Lord gave me freedom. My burden during the meetings of this Week of Prayer has been to impress the people that true service makes believers self-denying and self-sacrificing. They keep in view the need of individual holiness and consecration, that through the sanctification of the truth they may abound in works of benevolence to the uplifting of others. {17MR 43.2}

Christ said to the Samaritan woman, “If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink; thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water. . . . Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again: but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life.” Thus is presented the

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experience of the thankful heart. It continually overflows in blessings to others. {17MR 43.3}

Paul greatly desired to see the Colossians enjoying to the full the blessings of the gospel. He longed to be with them to speak to them words of encouragement, that their hearts might be comforted, “being knit together in love, and unto all riches of the full assurance of understanding to the acknowledgment of the mystery of God.” The Word of God is full of consolation, and presents great possibilities and advantages, which we should strive to appreciate. Through faith in Christ we may reach the highest standard in Christian perfection. {17MR 44.1}

The gospel influences those who receive it to attain to Christian obedience. They are inspired with hope, having that faith which works by love and purifies the soul, making the receiver Christlike in character. As Redeemer and Creator, Christ is the owner of man. He is glorified by the individual service of those who on this earth act as His helping hand. {17MR 44.2}

To refuse to obey the requirements of Christ, to fail to devote every capability to His service, is to rob God. He, our Lord and Saviour, calls for the cooperation of every human agency. As they strive to do good and be good, they will be successful in their work of reconciling man to God through Jesus Christ, unto all the riches of the full assurance of understanding. {17MR 44.3}

Christianity is not a half-and-half work–a service of God and mammon–but a full conversion to God. Christians have an understanding of spiritual things which unites them with Christ and with one another in love. There is no undecided work about true conversion. It is the work of the Holy Spirit upon human character. {17MR 44.4}

The Lord calls for workers who will deny self and follow in His footsteps.

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He calls for a faithful tithe, for gifts and offerings, that there may be in His treasury means wherewith to advance His work. Our money is His, and it is to be returned to Him. Christ is the light and life and joy of His people. Because He lives, they shall live also, and when He appears it will be to be glorified in His saints and to be admired in all them that believe. {17MR 44.5}

The spirit of liberality came into our meetings, and the offerings in the San Francisco church amounted to between two [hundred] and three hundred dollars. I feel very thankful to our heavenly Father for this evidence of the working of His Spirit upon hearts. The mission in San Francisco is self-supporting. Many calls are made upon the people for means to sustain the work in their own borders, yet they do not complain but willingly unite in giving for other parts of the field. {17MR 45.1}

Read the eighth chapter of Second Corinthians in the churches, and see if they will not catch the inspiration of liberality. God will help His people to see things in a correct light, and to meet the pressing emergencies which arise in aggressive warfare. As they give liberally of the Lord’s entrusted means, they will learn that as they impart they receive. God will give to them that they may give to others. {17MR 45.2}

During these meetings in San Francisco we had positive evidence of the presence of the Spirit of God. The Lord came very near to us, and His light shone upon us. Elder Corliss labored very earnestly, though suffering from a severe cold. {17MR 45.3}

On Wednesday I left San Francisco for Oakland, where I had promised to spend the last Sabbath and Sunday of the Week of Prayer. On Sabbath I spoke to a company of 600 people in the Oakland church. Through various circumstances I had been brought into a state of exhaustion, and as I looked over the congregation,

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and thought of my heart trouble, I feared that I would not be able to make the people hear. I asked them to pray for me. At first the weakness of my voice was apparent, but the Lord heard prayer, and my voice increased in strength.–Ms 1, 1901.

Ellen G. White Estate Washington, D. C. April 6, 1987. Entire Manuscript. {17MR 45.4}

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