Hiram Edson’s Daughter Remembers

SOUTHWESTERN UNION RECORD , March 2, 1920

EXPERIENCES AND RECOLLECTIONS OF THE MESSAGE

I have just been reading the Anniversary Number of the Review and Herald, and as I have looked into the faces of old familiar friends, it has aroused many recollections of the past. My whole life has been in close connection with the Advent Message. I was born about the time my parents accepted the Advent doctrine under the preaching of Wm. Miller in 1843. They were firm and true to the cause of truth to the close of their lives, and it called for such self-denial and and sacrifice in those early days, for its friends were few and mostly poor in this worlds goods.

After the passing of the time when they expected the Lord would come on the 22nd of October, 1844, a few of the most earnest and faithful ones were at the home of my father, (Hiram Edson), praying and studying the prophecies to learn the cause of the disappointment. After prayer they started out to visit some that had been interested, and were going through a corn field when suddenly father saw a bright light shining around him and heard these words, as of an audible voice: “The temple of God was opend in heaven and there was seen in His temple the ark of His testament.” The others passed on, but soon noticed he was not with them, and, looking back, asked what was the matter. He replied, “Brethren, there is new light for us.” They went to studying the prophecies, and the light on the subject of the Sanctuary was then brought out, which fully explained the cause of the disappointment. O. R. L. Crozer then wrote the article mentioned in the Review a few months ago. He was at father’s, and, finances being low, those interested in the Message having used all their ready means in proclaiming the Message, my mother sold her solid silver teaspoons and half of her large spoons to pay for having the article printed in the “Day Dawn.” That also opened up the subject of the seventh-day Sabbath.

The conference to which Brother and Sister White were invited, as noticed on page 8 of the Review, was held at father’s house, near Port Gibson, New York. Nearly all the Sabbath-keepers at that time met there, and my parents entertained them, the sisters sleeping in the house and the brethren in the haymow. Father cleaned and seated his barn floor to have a place for the meetings. That was a time that called for self-denial and sacrifice. Brother and Sister White were in very close circumstances. Father sold his sheep and gave $1500 to help them.

Another conference was held at father’s not long after this, and a mob of forty gathered in the dooryard, intent on breaking up the meeting. They rushed into the house and laid hold of one brother and dragged him to the door. Another brother stepped up and ordered them to let him go, when one of the mob took a griddle from off the stove and struck him, cutting him badly over the eye. Father then walked boldly out into the crowd and said: “I won’t give up my faith if you cut me into inch pieces and feed my flesh to the foxes of the desert and to the fowls of the air.” The Spirit of God accompanied the words with such power that the crowd all withdrew and they had a quiet meeting.

I, with my parents, attended the meeting at Balston Springs, at which it was decided to move the Review office to Rochester, N. Y., and buy a Washington hand press. I well remember hearing father say, “We, no doubt, will have a power press before the close—and maybe two or three.” That required a great stretch of faith at that time, but what do we see today?—many large power presses in various parts of the world, all of them running day and night, sending out the message of truth by the tons. The work, begun in such poverty and weakness, has grown mighty and strong, and God will carry it to a glorious consummation. There is still a great work to be done, but He will finish the work and cut it short in righteousness.

Nearly all of the faces shown in the Anniversary Number of the Review and Herald are familiar to me. The first page of the Present Truth looks very familiar. I well remember reading it when a child. I have no recollection of my parents keeping Sunday.

I truly praise the Lord that He has kept me in the love of the truth, while many bright and shining lights have gone out in darkness. Time has continued much longer than we expected, but it has been through the longsuffering of God, who is not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance. But it will not always wait. Jesus will soon come, and may reader and writer be able to say, “This is the Lord—we have waited for Him and He will save us.”

From one who has been long looking for the appearing of Christ.

MRS. V. O. CROSS.
Houston, Texas, Jan. 15, 1920.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/SUR/SUR19200302-V19-13__B/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=6

Advertisements

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: