How a Policeman and a Soldier Helped, 1917, Cuba

Australasian Record, February 26, 1917, page 5

How a Policeman and a Soldier Helped

BROTHER Emsley Willams, a colporteur in Cuba, recently had an experience at the time unpleasant, but which turned out for good in the end. Brother Kellman writes:

“Just before leaving for Honduras, Brother Willams left the train one evening in the town of Manacas, where he was to canvass, to go out where one of our brethren lived about two miles from town. He had two big bags filled with books as in Cuba we take orders one day and deliver the next.

“As he was slowly plodding his way along, just as he reached the outskirts of the village, he heard galloping of horses behind him. He was surprised a moment later as the cry in Spanish rang out Alza los Manos, “hands up.” It was a policeman and a mounted soldier. There was a recent robbery in the neighbourhood, and they were on the lookout for the thief, so spying this man with heavy bags, they thought they had the culprit sure. After searching and questioning him they saw their mistake, apolo- ogized for the trouble, and, to even things up, carried his heavy packages up to the home of the brother to whom he was going.

This laborious journey turned to be a pleasant walk with congenial companions. The policeman next day met him in town, introduced him to many of the influential people, from whom he took orders and delivered the books. The hold-up at night turned out to be the best thing that could have taken place for the benefit of his work there.”

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/AAR/AAR1917-V21-09/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=5

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