Archive for the ‘Business Attitude’ Category

An Update on AHL Work at Covenant Forum

April 6, 2009

Recent Additions:

E. A. Beavon
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2034.html?1238431234

The Bicycle Craze
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2044.html?1238760151

Charles Fitch
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/1535/2111.html?1238875143

We have been impressed with the amount of early documentation of Fitch’s life and work.

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1902, The Missionary Acre

March 25, 2009
The Missionary Acre, Review and Herald, August 26, 1902, page 21

The Missionary Acre, Review and Herald, August 26, 1902, page 21

William Arnold, Pioneer Book Seller

March 17, 2009

William Arnold, Pioneer Book Seller, A Chronology

william-arnold-1890

1884
Served on the nominations committee for the first annual meeting of the Sanitarium Improvement Company. YB 1885, p. 66

TO AUSTRALIA

1885
The first party of Seventh-day Adventist missionaries, consisting of S. N. Haskell, J. 0. Corliss, M. C. Israel (ministers), W. Arnold (a colporteur from Michigan), and H. Scott (a printer),; landed in Australia. Melbourne was chosen as the first field, and it proved a fruitful one, for at the close of 1886 there was a church of one hundred members established. RH 1918, V95-31

J. O. Corliss’ wife and two children came as well; as did Israel’s wife and their two daughters. On May 10, they took passage on the ship Australia from San Francisco, and twenty-eight days later landed in Sydney, June 8. In about a month from then they were all settled in Richmond, Melbourne, and on July 4, 1885, they held their first Sabbath school, their membership being eleven persons, comprising workers and their families (as listed above). They met in Haskell’s rented house in Richmond, Victoria (AAR 1901-07 sp03, p. 13).

The original Minute book for this gathering “recorded the following: Superintendent, Pastor S. N. Haskell; secretary, Jane Israel. The lesson study was, ‘The Saints’ Inheritance,’ and ten were present as students. No offering was recorded.” AAR 1965-33, p.2.

In less than three weeks, on July 21, a mission was opened in the Temperance Hall, Richmond. A little later that year, with the mission work well begun in Australia, S. N. Haskell left for New Zealand. RH 1948-19, p. 16

“These laborers met with opposition from both the pulpit and press. They worked as best they could, visiting, holding Bible-readings, and selling books, Brother Arnold selling over 1000 copies of Daniel and Revelation in Melbourne in less than a year. Many tears were shed and prayers offered in connection with this first year’s work. ” AAR 1901-08, p. 10.

“With the first contingent of workers came also Brother H. 8cott, the printer of the party. It was in the bedroom of Brother Scott in Richmond that the first type was set up and it was then conveyed by handcart to the local press for the printing of our first literature in Australia.

“Quite a number of older brethren will remember the old Bible Echo printed at Best Street, North Fitzroy. The printing press for this paper was given by Brother Arnold, who gladly donated £250 earned by the sale of “Daniel and the Revelation…” AAR 1935-30, p. 11.

TO ENGLAND

1887
November 22, Tenth Meeting of the 1887 General Conference Session: “26. That Wm. Arnold, now in Australia, go to England to help in establishing the canvassing work there.” YB 1888, p. 41.

1888
In June, 1888, Bro. Wm. Arnold arrived from Australia, and spent a few weeks canvassing for “Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation.” His efforts were attended with marked success. The willingness to read on the subjects presented in the Bible readings which have been held, is continually increasing, and many families have become interested in different parts of the city. Several soldiers at the barracks at Southampton have embraced the truth principally by reading. YB 1891, p. 75
Noted as England’s first colporteur. TCOG, 1945-3, p.5
1889
April, May and June; Arnold “very successful” in London. YB 1891, p. 76

THE WEST INDIES

“The work in the West Indies was begun by Brother Wm. Arnold, in the winter of 1888-9. He visited and sold books on the islands of Santa Croix, Saint Kitts, Nevis, Antigua, Montseratt, and Barbadoes. He gave to the International Tract Society the addresses of 1,200 persons who had purchased ” Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation” from him, and the society began sending literature to them and corresponding with them. A number began to obey as the result of this work.

1890
On November 7, 1890, Elder Dexter A. Ball sailed to Barbadoes, in company with Brother Arnold. A gentleman owning a mission building in Bridgetown invited Elder Ball to hold meetings in his chapel, and fifty-seven discourses were preached. A number accepted the truth, and since then a church has been organized.

Saint Vincent was then visited by Elder Ball, and also Antigua. At the latter place, the work of a sister who had become acquainted with the truth in London, England, had led several to accept it. About sixty services were held here, and twenty-six persons joined the believers in the West Indies. – Saint Kitts and Santa Croix were also visited. At Montseratt, an open-air service was held, and a number of books were sold.

1891
“We have also been able to respond to the pressing calls from the West Indies by sending Elder D. A. Ball of the Pennsylvania Conference to labor in that field, and with him Wm. Arnold.” YB 1891, p. 46

“Elder Ball then revisited Saint Kitts, to make arrangements for Brother Charles D. Adamson to enter the work. While there, three persons signed the covenant, as the result of personal work. On the way to Barbadoes, a few days were spent at Dominica. Reaching Barbadoes, after a long absence, it was found that the brethren there were of good courage, and their numbers had been increased. Brother Adamson joined Elder Ball in the work there for about six weeks, when, they went to the island of Grenada. Here they found a number keeping the Sabbath as the result of a brother’s efforts, who had received the truth through reading a book which he had purchased in South America.

“Brother Wm. Arnold is still canvassing in the islands, with good success.” YB 1892, p. 74, 75

IN DEMERARA (GUYANA)

Arnold works in Demerara (Guyana); writes a descriptive letter home to his children.

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

He spends the summer in Trinidad to wait out Demerara’s rainy season.

1892
Arnold works the summer in Tobago.

THE MAGIC POCKET VAPORIZER

1904
Marketing the Magic Pocket Vaporizer, “because everybody wants it.”

I find little difficulty in getting recommendations from influential people, having secured haif a dozen testimonials from among the clergy of this city (Battle Creek). The canvasser needs but little capital in selling this instrument, as deliveries are made as fast as opportunity affords, and In this way he will find his influence constantly increasing. A splendid opportnnity is also afforded to do missionary work among the suffering, and the canvasser can make good wages besides.

I predict a large sale for the Magic Pocket
Vaporizer.” ALUG 1904-45, p.11

HOME IN NEW YORK STATE

1908
April 25-26, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold attend a meeting at West Valley, New York. “We were glad to see Brother and Sister Wm. Arnold present. Brother Arnold is not very strong physically, but his courage and hope in the Lord is strong. ” ALUG 1908-19, p. 4.

1910
Lives at Ellicottville, New York. W. B. White reports on his visit with Arnold. ALUG 1910-01, p. 2.

LIVES IN COLORADO

BACK TO NEW YORK

1917
Lived in Colorado for a time and now coming back to Ellicottville. ALUG 1917-22, p. 8.

WILLIAM ARNOLD DIES

1922
William Arnold dies. Survived by his wife and daughter, Mabel. ALUG 1922-25, p. 8.

A FORM FOR RECORDING CHURCH BUSINESS

December 22, 2008

Review and Herald, May 9, 1878, page 7

A FORM FOR RECORDING CHURCH BUSINESS.

As many of the clerks of our churches have had but little experience in recording business meetings, they are frequently embarrassed to know how to go to work. This article is written to assist such persons. If they will study it carefully, and preserve it for reference, they can soon learn to record a meeting properly in the clerk’s book.

I was much pleased and edified by the “Business School” held at this place (Sigourney, Iowa) by Elds. Canright and Farnsworth. I am fully satisfied that every church, as well as our scattered brethren throughout the land, would be greatly benefited by such a course of training on the organization and business transactions of our churches. But as a great majority cannot avail themselves of the benefits of such instruction, it has occurred to me that a concise statement of the workings and business transactions of this school, published through the REVIEW, might be of service to many.

At the suggestion of those who had charge of the school, I will try to furnish a chapter.

There were about fifty persons convened in a comfortable meeting-house, and the exercises were conducted much after the style of a teachers’ institute, Elds. Canright and Farnsworth having charge. Each person was expected to keep a record of all business transacted, and in turn these records were examined, criticised, and corrected by the managers.

We had a church organized and business transacted by it, the object being to learn the art of doing church business and keeping church records. It is very evident that the business of our churches is often bunglingly done, and the records are sadly deficient. The following is supposed to be a form of business that might occur at and after the organization of a church society:—

A company of believers in the Bible doctrines held by S. D. Adventists, located at Sigourney, Iowa, convened in their church house, April 1, 1878, at 10 o’clock A. M.

After singing and prayer, Eld. D. M. Canright was called to the chair, and L. McCoy was chosen secretary.

The chairman stated the object of the meeting to be the organization of a church of Seventh-day Adventists, and requested those desiring to participate in the said organization to give their names to the secretary.

Whereupon the following named persons responded, to wit, L. McCoy, C. E. Moser, G. B. Starr, Rachel Buck, and Carrie Dalbey.

The chairman then asked each of this company if they had any objections to any one of the others, and there being no objection, he then asked them if they could freely and cheerfully fellowship one another. This being answered in the affirmative, they all, by a rising vote, united in the following covenant:—

“We hereby associate ourselves together, taking the name of Seventh-day Adventists, and covenanting to keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus.” This constituted them a church.

On motion of Bro. Starr, supported by Bro. Moser, Bro. L. McCoy was elected church clerk.

On motion of Bro. Moser, supported by Bro. Starr, the church adjourned to call of the chair. L. McCoy, Sec.

Sigourney, April 6, 1878, 9 A. M., the church convened for a business meeting, all the members having had notice of the same. Prayer by Bro. Starr.

On motion of Bro. McCoy, supported by sister Dalbey, sister Jessie P. Moser was received as a member of the church, subject to baptism.

Bro. Henry Nicola, bearing a letter of commendation from the church of S. D. Adventists at Richmond, Iowa, was, by motion of Bro. Starr, supported by Bro McCoy, duly received as a member of this church.

Bro. Asa Ruloff, a member of the Baptist church, having embraced our views, and desiring to be identified with our people, presented himself for membership. There being no objections.

On motion of Bro. Starr. supported by sister Buck, Bro. Ruloff was received.

On motion of Bro. Moser, supported by Bro. Nicola, the church adjourned to call of the chair. L. McCoy, Clerk.

Aug. 12, 1878, at 10 A.M., the church convened for business.

Meeting opened by singing and prayer, Eld. Canright in the chair.

Bro. C. E. Moser asked for a letter of commendation.

On motion of Bro. Asa Ruloff, supported by Bro. Starr, the clerk was instructed to give Bro. Moser a letter.

By unanimous vote of the church, all being present, Bro. H. Nicola was selected elder of the church, and was duly ordained as such by Eld. Canright.

Bro. McCoy at this meeting preferred charge against Bro. Asa Ruloff for immorality, alleging that Bro. R. had violated the fourth commandment, in that he had sold coal and otherwise permitted labor to be done in his mine on the Sabbath day, the third of August, 1878.

Bro. R. being present demanded an investigation, and the case was heard, Bro. R. having opportunity for defense.

On motion of Bro. Starr, supported by Bro. McCoy, Bro. R. was placed under censure by a unanimous vote of the church.

On motion, adjourned until 2 o’clock P. M.

Aug. 12, 1878, at 2 P. M., the church convened pursuant to adjournment, for the transaction of business, Eld. Nicola in the chair.

Bro. Starr presented resolutions expressive of the sorrow occasioned by the death of our beloved sister Jones, which occured on the 8th inst, who by her Christian deportment and faithfulness in the discharge of every duty, had won for herself a place in the hearts of all. Although her loss is a severe trial to this little band, yet we bow in meek submission to the will of Him who doeth all things well.

The resolutions were ordered placed upon the record, and a copy of same furnished to the bereaved family.

On motion of Bro. M., supported by Bro. B., the church adjourned.

L. McCoy, Clerk.

NOTE.—”Will the clerks of our churches please preserve the above article for reference? It gives the proper form of conducting and recording business meetings. Notice, (1.) The first thing to do in making a record of a meeting is to give the date, thus: April 1, 1878, 10 A. M.; or July 5, 1878, 2 P. M.; (2.) if a vote is taken upon any question, the clerk should state who made the motion and who seconded it, as it is sometimes very important to know; (3.) The clerk should always sign his name at the close of the record of each meeting.
If further instruction is desired, it will be given any time.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH18780509-V51-19/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=7

Notes by Newsman777:

This 1878 document:

1) Demonstrates secretary procedure of that era.
2) Illustrates role playing as an effective teaching method.
3) Provides leadership to the many church clerks.
4) Illustrates the role of a teaching institute.
5) Provides examples both of joining by baptism and by profession of faith.
6) Cites only two doctrinal points upon which the church formed.

F. C. Gilbert, Business Attitude

October 28, 2008

FORTY-SEVENTH MEETING
GENERAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
October 29, 1905

PRESENT:

A.G. Daniells, G.A. Irwin, I.H. Evans, G. B. Thompson, K. C. Russell, J. E. Froom, W. A. Spicer, and Elder F. C. Gilbert.

G.A. Irwin in the chair.

F. C.GILBERT:

The meeting was called at the request of Brother Gilbert, who asked counsel as to his work in behalf of the Jews. He explained the plan of work, the New England Conference paying his salary and traveling expenses in local S. D.A. church work, but his general traveling expenses, however, in work over the country and among outside churches being paid by contributions gathered.

The question came up as to how this work should be operated to avoid the plan of having funds sent to private individuals to be expended on individual judgment without accounting to a recognized body.

It was, agreed that it would be proper for Brother Gilbert to ask the Atlantic Union office to handle the accounts and to make provision so that he will be able to account to the Union for all money received, and expended, thus avoiding giving opportunity for any criticism.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/GCC/GCC1905/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=81