Archive for the ‘Christian Values’ Category

An Update on AHL Work at Covenant Forum

April 6, 2009

Recent Additions:

E. A. Beavon
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2034.html?1238431234

The Bicycle Craze
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2044.html?1238760151

Charles Fitch
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/1535/2111.html?1238875143

We have been impressed with the amount of early documentation of Fitch’s life and work.

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1894, Kneeland’s Christmas on Trinidad

March 18, 2009

Review and Herald, February 13, 1894, p. 4

OPEN DOORS IN TRINIDAD.

As our boat was detained in the harbor of Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, over Christmas, we improved the opportunity by going on shore and making the acquaintance of some of the persons with whom the International Tract and Missionary Society had been in correspondence.

When it was known that we were there in the interests of the tract society, we had no lack for friends, and we were gladly welcomed by all. Some had been receiving the Signs and other publications, which they had eagerly read and circulated ; in some instances carrying them on foot twenty miles to their friends. In this way very many had heard something of our work, and as a result, one family had begun the observance of the Sabbath, and others are convinced. This brother belonged to the Church of England, and as they were unable to convince him that he was in error, they expelled him from their midst. This incident only increased the discussion of the Sabbath question, and many questions were asked us on this subject. We tried to show them that Christians should honor Christ by keeping his law.

Services were desired before we left, and the Baptist mission building was kindly offered us. Christmas day with this people is wholly given up to amusements; but the invitation sent out soon gathered in quite a company, who gave good attention as we tried to present a few thoughts from Rom. 1 : 16.

G. W. KNEELAND.

Georgetown, British Guiana.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1894-07/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=4

1994, Rwanda, Carl Wilkens’ Story

March 5, 2009

“Carl Wilkens is the former head of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International in Rwanda. In 1994, he was the only American who chose to remain in the country after the genocide began. His choice to stay and try to help resulted in preventing the massacre of hundreds of children over the course of the genocide.”

The World Outside My Shoes Speaking Tour

Carl Wilkens visited our Religion 11 class March 4. In preparation for his visit, we studied the various news accounts of the Rwandan genocide, watched “Hotel Rwanda”, and examined the Adventist connections to the event, both positive and negative.

At some point we hope to report on what Carl Wilkens shared in detail. He proved to be an effective communicator. For our class of ninety minutes, the interaction between the students and Mr. Wilkens remained focused and lively.

He used Google Earth to show the geographical setting. He mentioned Hôtel des Mille Collines of “Hotel Rwanda”. He went there several times during the crisis. Paul Rusesabagina, the hero portrayed in the movie, attended Gitwe Adventist Secondary School.

He reported that he had been so busy that he had not become acquainted with his neighbors but that his children played with their children day after day. A friendly rapport developed. During the crisis, this saved their lives. People stood up for them. They had some Tutsis hiding in their house. But the people protected them.

Wilkens showed pictures of the people affected by the tragedy. Seven people hid away in a friend’s bathroom for three months on meagre rations. Another man had to whisper in his place of hiding for so long that he could not speak otherwise afterwards for some time. One boy found his mother among the dead. He noticed a pulse. Got her to a hospital. Begged for them to help her. She lived.

The Adventist pastor convicted of war crimes declared his innocence until his death. Carl Wilkens knew this pastor-administrator. They had worked on church matters together. The pastor was on the opposite side of town from where Wilkens was when the church betrayal took place. The pastor went to jail. Even while in prison, he gave Bible studies to his fellow inmates. His accusers related stories of him taking certain individuals out of the church before the massacre began. Grenades were thrown into the church. As people ran to escape they were cut down, slaughtered.

The pastor’s medical doctor son drove around in a jeep with a machine gun. His complicity was obvious.

Church administrators ordered Carl to leave. Even President Folkenburg sent a personal message telling him to leave. They did not want to order him to do so, nor to violate his conscience, but that he should get out.

He stayed because people need him. He saved lives by staying. He stressed that he did not do this all alone. He worked together with others. The children and adults connected with an orphanage owe their lives to his intervention with the Prime Minister who was one of the main perpetrators of the genocide.

There were many international soldiers present in the country; the UN, etc. They could have prevented the massacres.

We asked him how the experience affected his faith in God. Before the crisis, he was a weak, insecure Christian. The crisis helped him realize that his salvation was in Jesus and that he could count on Jesus for his assurance of salvation. This awareness of salvation in Christ inspired him to live for Him.

More on Rwanda can be found at The Adventist History Library at Covenant Forum. ***HERE***

Blessed Jesus, Meek and Lowly – Annie Smith, c. 1853

January 1, 2009

Hymns and Tunes, #501

blessed-jesus-meek-and-lowly1

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/HT/Hymns%20and%20Tunes/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=163

The Law, A Poem, R. F. Cottrell, 1852

December 31, 2008

the-law-1852-cottrell

Storrs on Laodicea, 1844

December 25, 2008

Review and Herald, May 16, 1854

EXAMINATION OF ISAIAH II, AND MICAH IV.

… Look at the so called church of the present day. Who is she most pleased with, the humble, self- denying, cross-bearing members, who are crucified to this world, or the rich, the “respectable” in the sight of the world, and those that can make show? Which do they most regard? Is it not a fact, that the latter are more pleasing to an exalted church than the former? And are not the churches “multiplying a spurious brood of strange children?” Where is their deadness to the world, its praise and its frowns? They dare not speak out against a popular sin, nor defend an unpopular truth. Reputation is at stake, and every other principle must give place to that. Said an old pilgrim, not long since, “When our church was small and poor, we were spiritual, lively in religion, and a happy band; but now we are numerous, fashionable, and like the world, and I do not feel at home.”

The church had multiplied a spurious brood of strange children; and such is the case almost universally. Yet she is saying, like the Laodicean church, “I am rich and increased in goods and have need of nothing,”Yes, she boasts of her schools, her colleges, her theological seminaries, her talented ministry, her richly endowed institutions. In her own eyes she sits “as a queen,” and is “no widow and shall see no sorrow.” So has the world fallen in love with the church that even the soldiers, with their guns, cannons, drums and fifes, will all join with it in celebrating the birth of the Prince of Peace; and Ministers are to be educated at the Military Academy to be Chaplains in the army and navy! Truly, how much that looks like “learning war no more!”

Not only that, but our churches at Christmas and other holidays, can have exhibitions in their meetinghouses that please the children of strangers about as well as the theatre! No wonder the church of this age is talking of conquering the the world, when she herself has fairly gone over to the world, and has become like the intoxicated man who thinks the ground rises up to him when he has fallen down to that. No wonder such a church is in convulsions on hearing the dreadful sound, “Behold the Bridegroom cometh.” She wish to see him! No, she is pleasing herself with the children of strangers.

But let us inquire, what else does the prophet say of this “peace and safety” crying church? He says, [verse 7,] “Their land also is full of silver and gold, neither is there any end of their treasures.” See the thousands and millions that these churches have laid up in one form or another; either in the hands of individual members, or corporate bodies; if possible to show their contempt of him” who though he was rich, for our sakes became poor;” acting as if their greatest desire was to be independent of God himself, and showing that they have no confidence in him…

— Geo. Storrs, in Mid. Cry 1844

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1854-V05-17/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=3

A Good Resolution, 1877

December 22, 2008

Atlantic Union Gleaner, July 22, 1931, (1877)

A GOOD RESOLUTION

Taken from the clerk’s records of the original Oakfield, Me., church, (now Dyer Brook) in Aroostook County, are the following resolutions passed at a church business meeting on the evening of November 1, 1877, Elder S. J. Hersum in the chair:

“Whereas, we are fast approaching the time when probation will close, and

“Whereas, Satan, according to the Bible which we believe is true, is to work with great power for the destruction of God’s people,

“Therefore, resolved, that we as members of the church in Oakfield, study the Bible and follow out all its teachings, believing that our salvation depends upon this, and that we will watch and pray that we be not used as instruments in the hands of Satan to wound the feelings of our brothers and sisters and the cause of God, by speaking of the faults of the brothers and sisters to others, before to the one that is at fault.

“Resolved, that we will stand by each member of the church and will by our prayers and comforting words, stay up the hands of each other under every trial.”

How we need the spirit of these resolutions, not only on our church records, but in our hearts. May God grant it as we enter the greatest Harvest Ingathering campaign in our history. Would it not be a great encouragement and help to us if each knew the other was praying for him?

B. M. HEALD.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/ALUG/ALUG19310722-V30-28/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=3

—————-

Notes by Newsman 777

1) Fast approaching the time when probation will close…” in 1877. A belief in an imminent return of Christ can motivate the church to heighten their moral decisions.

2) “Our salvation depends upon” studying the Bible and following all its teachings. Shall we assume that they understood about salvation in Jesus? When is salvation by “following all its teachings” considered adequate for salvation?

3) “Wound the feelings.” The gist of this resolution addresses an ongoing problem in an organization; interpersonal relationships and unity.

4) “Stay up the hands of each other under every trial.” This metaphor comes from the story of Aaron and Hur holding up the hands of Moses. We would do well to practice this day by day.