Archive for the ‘Chronology’ Category

An Update on AHL Work at Covenant Forum

April 6, 2009

Recent Additions:

E. A. Beavon
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2034.html?1238431234

The Bicycle Craze
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2044.html?1238760151

Charles Fitch
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/1535/2111.html?1238875143

We have been impressed with the amount of early documentation of Fitch’s life and work.

Timeline, SDA Church in Trinidad

March 20, 2009

Adventist History Library (AHL) is currently developing a comprehensive timeline for the Adventist work in Trinidad. It can be found *HERE* at Covenant Forum’s AHL section.

William Arnold, Pioneer Book Seller

March 17, 2009

William Arnold, Pioneer Book Seller, A Chronology

william-arnold-1890

1884
Served on the nominations committee for the first annual meeting of the Sanitarium Improvement Company. YB 1885, p. 66

TO AUSTRALIA

1885
The first party of Seventh-day Adventist missionaries, consisting of S. N. Haskell, J. 0. Corliss, M. C. Israel (ministers), W. Arnold (a colporteur from Michigan), and H. Scott (a printer),; landed in Australia. Melbourne was chosen as the first field, and it proved a fruitful one, for at the close of 1886 there was a church of one hundred members established. RH 1918, V95-31

J. O. Corliss’ wife and two children came as well; as did Israel’s wife and their two daughters. On May 10, they took passage on the ship Australia from San Francisco, and twenty-eight days later landed in Sydney, June 8. In about a month from then they were all settled in Richmond, Melbourne, and on July 4, 1885, they held their first Sabbath school, their membership being eleven persons, comprising workers and their families (as listed above). They met in Haskell’s rented house in Richmond, Victoria (AAR 1901-07 sp03, p. 13).

The original Minute book for this gathering “recorded the following: Superintendent, Pastor S. N. Haskell; secretary, Jane Israel. The lesson study was, ‘The Saints’ Inheritance,’ and ten were present as students. No offering was recorded.” AAR 1965-33, p.2.

In less than three weeks, on July 21, a mission was opened in the Temperance Hall, Richmond. A little later that year, with the mission work well begun in Australia, S. N. Haskell left for New Zealand. RH 1948-19, p. 16

“These laborers met with opposition from both the pulpit and press. They worked as best they could, visiting, holding Bible-readings, and selling books, Brother Arnold selling over 1000 copies of Daniel and Revelation in Melbourne in less than a year. Many tears were shed and prayers offered in connection with this first year’s work. ” AAR 1901-08, p. 10.

“With the first contingent of workers came also Brother H. 8cott, the printer of the party. It was in the bedroom of Brother Scott in Richmond that the first type was set up and it was then conveyed by handcart to the local press for the printing of our first literature in Australia.

“Quite a number of older brethren will remember the old Bible Echo printed at Best Street, North Fitzroy. The printing press for this paper was given by Brother Arnold, who gladly donated £250 earned by the sale of “Daniel and the Revelation…” AAR 1935-30, p. 11.

TO ENGLAND

1887
November 22, Tenth Meeting of the 1887 General Conference Session: “26. That Wm. Arnold, now in Australia, go to England to help in establishing the canvassing work there.” YB 1888, p. 41.

1888
In June, 1888, Bro. Wm. Arnold arrived from Australia, and spent a few weeks canvassing for “Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation.” His efforts were attended with marked success. The willingness to read on the subjects presented in the Bible readings which have been held, is continually increasing, and many families have become interested in different parts of the city. Several soldiers at the barracks at Southampton have embraced the truth principally by reading. YB 1891, p. 75
Noted as England’s first colporteur. TCOG, 1945-3, p.5
1889
April, May and June; Arnold “very successful” in London. YB 1891, p. 76

THE WEST INDIES

“The work in the West Indies was begun by Brother Wm. Arnold, in the winter of 1888-9. He visited and sold books on the islands of Santa Croix, Saint Kitts, Nevis, Antigua, Montseratt, and Barbadoes. He gave to the International Tract Society the addresses of 1,200 persons who had purchased ” Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation” from him, and the society began sending literature to them and corresponding with them. A number began to obey as the result of this work.

1890
On November 7, 1890, Elder Dexter A. Ball sailed to Barbadoes, in company with Brother Arnold. A gentleman owning a mission building in Bridgetown invited Elder Ball to hold meetings in his chapel, and fifty-seven discourses were preached. A number accepted the truth, and since then a church has been organized.

Saint Vincent was then visited by Elder Ball, and also Antigua. At the latter place, the work of a sister who had become acquainted with the truth in London, England, had led several to accept it. About sixty services were held here, and twenty-six persons joined the believers in the West Indies. – Saint Kitts and Santa Croix were also visited. At Montseratt, an open-air service was held, and a number of books were sold.

1891
“We have also been able to respond to the pressing calls from the West Indies by sending Elder D. A. Ball of the Pennsylvania Conference to labor in that field, and with him Wm. Arnold.” YB 1891, p. 46

“Elder Ball then revisited Saint Kitts, to make arrangements for Brother Charles D. Adamson to enter the work. While there, three persons signed the covenant, as the result of personal work. On the way to Barbadoes, a few days were spent at Dominica. Reaching Barbadoes, after a long absence, it was found that the brethren there were of good courage, and their numbers had been increased. Brother Adamson joined Elder Ball in the work there for about six weeks, when, they went to the island of Grenada. Here they found a number keeping the Sabbath as the result of a brother’s efforts, who had received the truth through reading a book which he had purchased in South America.

“Brother Wm. Arnold is still canvassing in the islands, with good success.” YB 1892, p. 74, 75

IN DEMERARA (GUYANA)

Arnold works in Demerara (Guyana); writes a descriptive letter home to his children.

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

He spends the summer in Trinidad to wait out Demerara’s rainy season.

1892
Arnold works the summer in Tobago.

THE MAGIC POCKET VAPORIZER

1904
Marketing the Magic Pocket Vaporizer, “because everybody wants it.”

I find little difficulty in getting recommendations from influential people, having secured haif a dozen testimonials from among the clergy of this city (Battle Creek). The canvasser needs but little capital in selling this instrument, as deliveries are made as fast as opportunity affords, and In this way he will find his influence constantly increasing. A splendid opportnnity is also afforded to do missionary work among the suffering, and the canvasser can make good wages besides.

I predict a large sale for the Magic Pocket
Vaporizer.” ALUG 1904-45, p.11

HOME IN NEW YORK STATE

1908
April 25-26, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold attend a meeting at West Valley, New York. “We were glad to see Brother and Sister Wm. Arnold present. Brother Arnold is not very strong physically, but his courage and hope in the Lord is strong. ” ALUG 1908-19, p. 4.

1910
Lives at Ellicottville, New York. W. B. White reports on his visit with Arnold. ALUG 1910-01, p. 2.

LIVES IN COLORADO

BACK TO NEW YORK

1917
Lived in Colorado for a time and now coming back to Ellicottville. ALUG 1917-22, p. 8.

WILLIAM ARNOLD DIES

1922
William Arnold dies. Survived by his wife and daughter, Mabel. ALUG 1922-25, p. 8.

The Adventist Church in Indonesia, a Time Line

March 8, 2009

This post is in its beginning stages. Our Covenant Forum site lends itself to extensive posts on this same topic. You can find more information there. Click here.

Indonesia, A Chronology

1893
R. W. Munson opened a home for orphans in Singapore.

1899
November 11, R. W. Munson leaves New York for Padang, Sumatra to work among the Chinese there. They meet Tay Hong Siang, one of the first three boys to be admitted to the Singapore orphanage, now working in Padang. Tay and his wife and baby come to live and work with the Munson family. Tay has already found one Chinese man was has accepted the Gospel and has already begun keeping the Sabbath.

1900
Munson begins an English language school in Padang. He calls it a mission school, “pure and simple”.
December 1, The Australasian Union Record presents a major mission study of what was then called Malaysia by R. W. Munson

1902
E.H. Gates visits with Munson. They travel to Deli, Penang, and other places. They seek to extend the work.

1904
Pastor G. F. Jones and wife and
Brother R. A. Caldwell sail for the East Indies to open a mission in Singapore.

1905
Brother and Sister E. C. Davey to Singapore as medical missionaries.

1906
In February, Brother F. Parkin reached Singapore; an evangelical canvasser.

In the Dutch East Indies, to proselyte among the Mohammedans is forbidden by law; but there is no law to forbid the circulation of religious literature.

1909
R. W. Munson returns to Java from Australia as a translator at Soekaboemi
Miss Janz gives “to us oversight of her little colony of two hundred persons.”

1910
The Malay Messenger of Truth Begins

1911
The first baptism in Java

1912
The first SDA Church organized on Java

1913
Tha Malaysian Union Mission organized, included: Sumatra and East and West Java

1921
Samuel Rantung’s work leads to a church organazed in the Celebes.

1926
People from the Lake Toba region request instruction in the Bible. Some already keeping the Sabbath.

1927
Petition sent to Batavia requesting Religious Liberty for Central Sumatra. (Kime)

1929
Territory organized as the Netherlands East Indies Union Mission with 1700 members and 48 churches and companies.
West Java Mission, H. Eelsing reports.
22 Sabbath Schools, 698 members
7 Church Schools, 650 students
Central Sumatra (Batakland) Youngberg reports on work of Kime.
Sister Kime very sick, they are on leave.
School and Medical Work
January 1929, Religious Liberty granted to Kime’s work.

1940-1944
Dutch Government inters all Germans missionaries.

1952
Church Membership reaches 10 000

1962
Chruch Membership reaches 20 000

2003
Inodnesia divided into East Indonesian Union Conference and West Indonesian Union Mission;
part of the Southern Asia-Pacific Division
1100 Churches
200 000 members

Sources:

Land, G (2005). Historical Dictionary of Seventh-day Adventists: Historical Dictionaries of Religions Philosophies, and Movements, No. 56. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0810853450, 9780810853454. 419 pages. Available as a Google Book ***Here***
.

Australasian Union Record
Asiatic Division Outlook

Blessed Jesus, Meek and Lowly – Annie Smith, c. 1853

January 1, 2009

Hymns and Tunes, #501

blessed-jesus-meek-and-lowly1

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/HT/Hymns%20and%20Tunes/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=163

Judge Not, Poem, 1856

January 1, 2009

Review and Herald, January 3, 1856

judge-not-01-03-1856

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1856-V07-14/index.djvu

The Law, A Poem, R. F. Cottrell, 1852

December 31, 2008

the-law-1852-cottrell

Storrs on Laodicea, 1844

December 25, 2008

Review and Herald, May 16, 1854

EXAMINATION OF ISAIAH II, AND MICAH IV.

… Look at the so called church of the present day. Who is she most pleased with, the humble, self- denying, cross-bearing members, who are crucified to this world, or the rich, the “respectable” in the sight of the world, and those that can make show? Which do they most regard? Is it not a fact, that the latter are more pleasing to an exalted church than the former? And are not the churches “multiplying a spurious brood of strange children?” Where is their deadness to the world, its praise and its frowns? They dare not speak out against a popular sin, nor defend an unpopular truth. Reputation is at stake, and every other principle must give place to that. Said an old pilgrim, not long since, “When our church was small and poor, we were spiritual, lively in religion, and a happy band; but now we are numerous, fashionable, and like the world, and I do not feel at home.”

The church had multiplied a spurious brood of strange children; and such is the case almost universally. Yet she is saying, like the Laodicean church, “I am rich and increased in goods and have need of nothing,”Yes, she boasts of her schools, her colleges, her theological seminaries, her talented ministry, her richly endowed institutions. In her own eyes she sits “as a queen,” and is “no widow and shall see no sorrow.” So has the world fallen in love with the church that even the soldiers, with their guns, cannons, drums and fifes, will all join with it in celebrating the birth of the Prince of Peace; and Ministers are to be educated at the Military Academy to be Chaplains in the army and navy! Truly, how much that looks like “learning war no more!”

Not only that, but our churches at Christmas and other holidays, can have exhibitions in their meetinghouses that please the children of strangers about as well as the theatre! No wonder the church of this age is talking of conquering the the world, when she herself has fairly gone over to the world, and has become like the intoxicated man who thinks the ground rises up to him when he has fallen down to that. No wonder such a church is in convulsions on hearing the dreadful sound, “Behold the Bridegroom cometh.” She wish to see him! No, she is pleasing herself with the children of strangers.

But let us inquire, what else does the prophet say of this “peace and safety” crying church? He says, [verse 7,] “Their land also is full of silver and gold, neither is there any end of their treasures.” See the thousands and millions that these churches have laid up in one form or another; either in the hands of individual members, or corporate bodies; if possible to show their contempt of him” who though he was rich, for our sakes became poor;” acting as if their greatest desire was to be independent of God himself, and showing that they have no confidence in him…

— Geo. Storrs, in Mid. Cry 1844

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1854-V05-17/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=3

Uriah Smith, Poet

December 18, 2008

THE WARNING VOICE

-0 F-

T I M E AND P R O P H E C Y.

BY URIAH SMITH

Part One a
Part One b
Part One c
Part One d
Part One e

Part Two a
Part Two b
Part Two c

Hiram Edson’s Daughter Remembers

December 14, 2008

SOUTHWESTERN UNION RECORD , March 2, 1920

EXPERIENCES AND RECOLLECTIONS OF THE MESSAGE

I have just been reading the Anniversary Number of the Review and Herald, and as I have looked into the faces of old familiar friends, it has aroused many recollections of the past. My whole life has been in close connection with the Advent Message. I was born about the time my parents accepted the Advent doctrine under the preaching of Wm. Miller in 1843. They were firm and true to the cause of truth to the close of their lives, and it called for such self-denial and and sacrifice in those early days, for its friends were few and mostly poor in this worlds goods.

After the passing of the time when they expected the Lord would come on the 22nd of October, 1844, a few of the most earnest and faithful ones were at the home of my father, (Hiram Edson), praying and studying the prophecies to learn the cause of the disappointment. After prayer they started out to visit some that had been interested, and were going through a corn field when suddenly father saw a bright light shining around him and heard these words, as of an audible voice: “The temple of God was opend in heaven and there was seen in His temple the ark of His testament.” The others passed on, but soon noticed he was not with them, and, looking back, asked what was the matter. He replied, “Brethren, there is new light for us.” They went to studying the prophecies, and the light on the subject of the Sanctuary was then brought out, which fully explained the cause of the disappointment. O. R. L. Crozer then wrote the article mentioned in the Review a few months ago. He was at father’s, and, finances being low, those interested in the Message having used all their ready means in proclaiming the Message, my mother sold her solid silver teaspoons and half of her large spoons to pay for having the article printed in the “Day Dawn.” That also opened up the subject of the seventh-day Sabbath.

The conference to which Brother and Sister White were invited, as noticed on page 8 of the Review, was held at father’s house, near Port Gibson, New York. Nearly all the Sabbath-keepers at that time met there, and my parents entertained them, the sisters sleeping in the house and the brethren in the haymow. Father cleaned and seated his barn floor to have a place for the meetings. That was a time that called for self-denial and sacrifice. Brother and Sister White were in very close circumstances. Father sold his sheep and gave $1500 to help them.

Another conference was held at father’s not long after this, and a mob of forty gathered in the dooryard, intent on breaking up the meeting. They rushed into the house and laid hold of one brother and dragged him to the door. Another brother stepped up and ordered them to let him go, when one of the mob took a griddle from off the stove and struck him, cutting him badly over the eye. Father then walked boldly out into the crowd and said: “I won’t give up my faith if you cut me into inch pieces and feed my flesh to the foxes of the desert and to the fowls of the air.” The Spirit of God accompanied the words with such power that the crowd all withdrew and they had a quiet meeting.

I, with my parents, attended the meeting at Balston Springs, at which it was decided to move the Review office to Rochester, N. Y., and buy a Washington hand press. I well remember hearing father say, “We, no doubt, will have a power press before the close—and maybe two or three.” That required a great stretch of faith at that time, but what do we see today?—many large power presses in various parts of the world, all of them running day and night, sending out the message of truth by the tons. The work, begun in such poverty and weakness, has grown mighty and strong, and God will carry it to a glorious consummation. There is still a great work to be done, but He will finish the work and cut it short in righteousness.

Nearly all of the faces shown in the Anniversary Number of the Review and Herald are familiar to me. The first page of the Present Truth looks very familiar. I well remember reading it when a child. I have no recollection of my parents keeping Sunday.

I truly praise the Lord that He has kept me in the love of the truth, while many bright and shining lights have gone out in darkness. Time has continued much longer than we expected, but it has been through the longsuffering of God, who is not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance. But it will not always wait. Jesus will soon come, and may reader and writer be able to say, “This is the Lord—we have waited for Him and He will save us.”

From one who has been long looking for the appearing of Christ.

MRS. V. O. CROSS.
Houston, Texas, Jan. 15, 1920.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/SUR/SUR19200302-V19-13__B/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=6