Archive for the ‘Doctrines’ Category

1852, A Paper For Children

April 25, 2009

Review and Herald, July 8, 1852, page 5

A PAPER FOR CHILDREN

WE design publishing a small monthly paper, containing matter for the benefit of the youth. And we are satisfied that our brethren and sisters will agree with us, that something of the kind is very much needed. The children should have a paper of their own, one that will interest and instruct them.

God is at work among the children who have believing parents, or guardians, and many of them are being converted, and they need to be instructed in the present truth. And there are a portion of the children who have believing parents, or guardians, who are neglected, and do not have right instruction, consequently, they do not manifest much interest for their own salvation. We trust that such a paper as we design publishing would interest such children, and also be the means of waking up their parents, or guardians to a sense of their important duty. On them rests the awful responsibility of training souls for the kingdorn of God. But it is a lamentable fact that many of their children are left without suitable instruction. We feel more on this subject than we can express. May God wake up his people to a sense of their duty to those young minds, intrusted to their care, to guide in the channel of virtue and holiness.

We intend to give four or five lessons, in the form of questions and answers, in each number, one for each week for Sabbath-School lessons. These Schools can be held where there are but two or three children as well as where there are more.

We invite our brethren and sisters, also our young friends, to furnish matter, original or selected, for the little paper. Let all be free to write. Communicate your thoughts with simplicity and clearness, with a heart that feels the condition of the tender, yet neglected youth, that must soon witness the day of the Lord. We hope that matter for the first number will be sent in immediately, as we wish to prepare it before we leave for our Eastern tour.

We publish this paper on our own responsibility, and think it duty to set the price at twenty five cents for a volume of twelve numbers, to be paid in advance, or within three months from the date of the first number.

Will some brother in each place, obtain all the names of the children that desire the paper, collect the means to pay for it, and forward it to us.

The paper will cost, including postage, only about three cents a month. Many little boys and girls spend enongh for candies and toys, that are of no real value, to pay for five or six such papers. We mean that all the children that cannot pay for it, who wish to read it, shall have it free, and we have no doubt but many of the children will deny themselves of toys, so as to be able to pay for their own, and some poor little boys’ or girls’ paper. We hope our young friends will do what they can, and we will try to give them an interesting and instructive little sheet.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1852-V03-05/index.djvu?djvuopts&page= 5

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1740, The World’s First Sabbath School?

April 25, 2009

THE FIRST SABBATH SCHOOL.

“THERE is good reason for thinking that the first Sabbath-school in this country, if not in the world, was established at Ephrata, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. Of this school Rev. Edwin W. Rice writes to the Sunday School World as follows :
______________________________________________

Among the earliest Saturday Sabbath-schools of this country, that at Ephrata, Pa., has long held a prominent place. The late Mr. Pardee, in his Sabbath-school Index, mentions it as “the first Sabbath- school of which we have any authentic, definite and detailed account, extending over a period of a quarter of a century.” This statement might lead some to suppose that there is quite a full history of the school now to be found. But it is not clearly known in what year the school was organized, precisely how it was conducted, nor whether it continued uninterruptedly from its organization to its final discontinuance, after the battle of Brandywine, when the building in which it was held was given up for an army hospital.

The Sabbath-school was first proposed and commenced by Ludwig Hacker (Hoecker), or ” Brother Obed,” as he was familiarly called. He was the teacher of a secular school established at Ephrata, under the direction of the German Seventh-Day Baptists, a denomination which separated from the Dunkers, or German Baptists, in 1728, under Conrad Beissel, who adopted the observance of the seventh, instead of the first day of the week, as the Christian Sabbath.

Beissel and many of his associates were men of education, and they established, at a very early period, a secular school, which soon gained such an honorable reputation that many young men from Philadelphia and Baltimore were sent there to be educated. Ludwig Hacker came to Ephrata, in 1739, as a teacher of this school.

Some time after his arrival, probably in 1740, he projected and commenced a school in the afternoons of their Sabbaths, “to give instruction to the indigent children, who were kept from regular school by employments which their necessities obliged them to be engaged at during the “week, as well as to give religious instruction to those of better circumstances.”

Of the success of this school Dr. Fahnestock, writing in 1835, says : ” It flourished for many years, and was attended with some remarkable circumstances. It produced an anxious inquiry among the juvenile population who attended the school, which increased and grew into what is termed a revival of religion. The scholars of the Sabbath-school met together everyday, before and after common school hours, to pray and exhort one another, under the superintendence of one of the brethren. The excitement ran into excess, and betrayed a zeal not according to knowledge, which induced Friedsam [Beissel] to discourage an enterprise which had been commenced, and was partly under way, viz : to erect a house for its especial use, to be called ” Succoth.” The building was, however, completed some time after the year 1749. It was located upon the brow of the lull, some distance from, and overlooking the chapel and other buildings of the society. It is believed to have been built in the same general style, and of materials similar to the “Sisters’ House,” the small ” Chapel,” and the ” Brothers’ House,” which are still standing, and are still occupied by a few of the surviving members of this religious colony.

The buildings are singular, and of very peculiar architecture, the outside of the walls having been covered with shingles or clapboards. It must be remembered that Beissel and his religious followers adopted a conventical mode of life in 1732, and also the dress of the White Friars, giving monastic names to their members, as Friedsam to Biessel. They commended celibacy, and the holding of the property in common, but did not make either compulsory; they did not approve of paying ministers any salary, and their order of worship was very simple. The society at Ephrata owned a farm, and were offered five thousand acres of land by William Penn, but declined the gift, fearing that the possession of so much property by them might create a worldly spirit.”
______________________________________________

Pennsylvania school journal

By Pennsylvania. Dept. of Public Instruction, Pennsylvania.
Dept. of Common Schools, Pennsylvania State Education Association
Published by Pennsylvania State Education Association, 1875
Item notes: v. 24
Original from Harvard University
Digitized 5 May 2007

page 342-343

A Google Book

An Update on AHL Work at Covenant Forum

April 6, 2009

Recent Additions:

E. A. Beavon
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2034.html?1238431234

The Bicycle Craze
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/584/2044.html?1238760151

Charles Fitch
http://www.covenantforum.com/discus/messages/1535/2111.html?1238875143

We have been impressed with the amount of early documentation of Fitch’s life and work.

1894, Lord Opened Way to Trinidad, Adamson

March 18, 2009

1894, Charles Adamson in Trinidad

Review and Herald, March 6, 1894, p. 9

THE WEST INDIES

Windward and Leeward Groups.

AFTER Elder D. A. Ball left me in Antigua, I endeavored to put in my time in the sale of books, and in holding public meetings in the different villages; and while I enjoyed God’s blessing in my feeble efforts there, I longed to go to the island ol Trinidad. This became a burden to me. I placed the matter before the Lord, and he opened the way for me to go in a most wonderful manner. After many fruitless efforts, I secured $24,— all I could call my own in this world,—and Oct. 9, 1893, my family and I sailed for Barbadoes. I remained here two months, giving all the time I could to the dear brethren. The little company here are living on
the promises of God, and are full of the glorious hope.

I left my family here, and sailed Oct. 12 for Granada. This, is an island 100 miles from Barbadoos. Landing at Greenville, the second town, I remained seven days, and sold three “Bible Headings.” The majority of the people in this island are Roman Catholics. I left here Oct. 22 for Trinidad, landing on that island the 25th. Port-of-Spain, the capital, is a city of nearly 4000 inhabitants, with all modern improvements. I found four Sabbath-keepers here, and sold three books.

Nov. 22 I took the train for San Fernando, the second seaport town on the island, twenty-five miles from Port-of-Spain. I met many at this place who sighed after something pure ; they earnestly asked for some one to instruct them in the way of truth. There are six here who are deeply interested. I sold two books. From here I went to Princetown, and visited the correspondents of the International Tract Society. They are very grateful for the reading-matter sent them. A tailor signed the covenant to obey and live. I returned to Port-of-Spain, Nov. 9, visited the dear ones, and showed them the necessity of assembling together. On the 12th we formed a Sabbath-school of five members, all full of bright hopes.

Nov. 25 I brought my family from Barbadoes. I cannot begin to tell how much we have enjoyed God’s blessing. Our needs are all supplied, and truly light is increasing on our pathway. Our Sabbath-school has increased from five to nine. The greatest number of the people here, especially the upper class, are Roman Catholics. The Freethinkers have a society, and Atheism and Universalism also flourish. There are about 80,000 Hindus, who are the contract laborers. The Canadian Mission is doing a good work for them, and there are many among this people who are thirsting after truth. May the Lord enable us to do something for them soon for us and for the effort here.

CHARLES D. ADAMSON.

Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1894-10/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=9

1894, Kneeland’s Christmas on Trinidad

March 18, 2009

Review and Herald, February 13, 1894, p. 4

OPEN DOORS IN TRINIDAD.

As our boat was detained in the harbor of Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, over Christmas, we improved the opportunity by going on shore and making the acquaintance of some of the persons with whom the International Tract and Missionary Society had been in correspondence.

When it was known that we were there in the interests of the tract society, we had no lack for friends, and we were gladly welcomed by all. Some had been receiving the Signs and other publications, which they had eagerly read and circulated ; in some instances carrying them on foot twenty miles to their friends. In this way very many had heard something of our work, and as a result, one family had begun the observance of the Sabbath, and others are convinced. This brother belonged to the Church of England, and as they were unable to convince him that he was in error, they expelled him from their midst. This incident only increased the discussion of the Sabbath question, and many questions were asked us on this subject. We tried to show them that Christians should honor Christ by keeping his law.

Services were desired before we left, and the Baptist mission building was kindly offered us. Christmas day with this people is wholly given up to amusements; but the invitation sent out soon gathered in quite a company, who gave good attention as we tried to present a few thoughts from Rom. 1 : 16.

G. W. KNEELAND.

Georgetown, British Guiana.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1894-07/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=4

1892, Chadwick Visits Trinidad and British Guiana

March 17, 2009

1892, Spring, L. C. Chadwick Reports

Review and Herald, June 21, 1892, p. 12

TRINIDAD AND BRITISH GUIANA

AFTER my last report, I spent a few days at Trinidad, Where “nothing has ever been done in the interests of the present truth, except that brother Arnold is now delivering large numbers of ”Great Controversy,” and the International Tract Society is commencing a correspondence, which is showing good results. This is a beautiful island, and one in which ministerial labor should soon be begun. As I visit these fields, and see the open doors before us on every hand, my heart goes out in prayer for our people to awaken to the responsibility that rests on us to support our foreign work, that we may extend it into all these islands and other countries toward which we have hardly turned our attention. There are about seventy thousand Hindus in Trinidad, or about one third of the population. Many of them have received a knowledge of the true God, and we should be doing something for them.

I spent twenty-two days in British Guiana, from April 27 to May 19. Five years ago Elder G. G. Rupert labored here two months, and brother Geo. King sold some books. A small church was organized. Last year brother Arnold sold several hundred books in the colony, which has a population of about three hundred thousand, of whom one third are Hindus. The church has struggled along under difficulties, among which has been a division in their own numbers; but in the face of all these, others have received the truth, and there has never been so widespread an interest to know more of the message, as there is at the present time.

My labors were bestowed chiefly upon the church and the believers. By the blessing of God, differences vanished, hearts were united, and I believe that much good was accomplished. I went out eighty-five miles in the country, held a few meetings, and baptized eight, and later sixteen were baptized in Georgetown, of whom three were Hindus. The church was strengthened, and I left it with a membership of forty-one. The officers were unanimously chosen, and we felt that the Lord sanctioned the service when the elder and deacons were set apart for their work, with prayer and laying on of hands. At the farewell service, we celebrated the ordinances, and it was a time of refreshing. If all continue to walk in unity and love, the influence of the cause may be greatly extended. This is an important field, and we should have one minister located in this colony, to develop the interest that now exists.

L. C. CHADWICK.

1954, Edward Earl Cleveland in Montgomery

March 5, 2009

For More Articles about and by E. E. Cleveland see this site.

The link to Ciro Sepulveda’s full article is here: The Tent and the Cathedral:

White-Collar Adventists and Their Search for Respectability

Ciro Sepulveda

The squad cars drove up to the tent on the corner of Smythe and High Street, across the street from the Tijuana Night Club, in Montgomery, Alabama, the summer of 1954. The officers walked through the aisles of the tent as a thousand or so African-Americans listened to evangelist Edward Earl Cleveland. Initially few noticed. In time, however, the audience became distracted and Cleveland calmly stated, “No need to worry; let the officers do their jobs.” Someone reported that Adventists were violating Alabama ordinances by allowing Whites and Blacks to commingle at a public meeting. Cleveland had publicly insisted such ordinances need not be obeyed since all are children of one God.

The tent in the infested district of Montgomery received two more visitors that summer when the Reverend Ralph Abernathy, pastor of the largest Black congregation in the city and the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., canceled their vacations because the Adventists were stealing their sheep. A seamstress named Rosa Parks from the local Lutheran congregation, along with members from other denominations, attended the meetings regularly. Abernathy and King came to investigate. King told Cleveland: “I was informed that a Black Billy Graham was preaching the Gospel, but all I heard was ‘the Law, the Law and the Law.’”

Cleveland, unimpressed by theological discourse, responded; “You must have arrived late because all I preached was ‘the Lord, the Lord, and the Lord.’”

For a century, tents, like the one in Montgomery run by Adventist itinerants, popped up all over the world: the Philippines, Africa, Central and South America, the Caribbean, etc. In 1854 Adventists pitched their first tent on the corner of Van Buren and Tompkins Street in Battle Creek, Michigan. When Adventist numbers grew to a couple of thousand, ten years later, a dozen or so tents appeared in the infested districts of the Old West. By the end of the century tents surfaced from California to New York. When E. E. Cleveland confronted the civil and religious authorities in Montgomery, Adventists had grown into hundreds of thousands, and tents continued to be centerpieces of Adventist ethos…

1994, Rwanda, Carl Wilkens’ Story

March 5, 2009

“Carl Wilkens is the former head of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International in Rwanda. In 1994, he was the only American who chose to remain in the country after the genocide began. His choice to stay and try to help resulted in preventing the massacre of hundreds of children over the course of the genocide.”

The World Outside My Shoes Speaking Tour

Carl Wilkens visited our Religion 11 class March 4. In preparation for his visit, we studied the various news accounts of the Rwandan genocide, watched “Hotel Rwanda”, and examined the Adventist connections to the event, both positive and negative.

At some point we hope to report on what Carl Wilkens shared in detail. He proved to be an effective communicator. For our class of ninety minutes, the interaction between the students and Mr. Wilkens remained focused and lively.

He used Google Earth to show the geographical setting. He mentioned Hôtel des Mille Collines of “Hotel Rwanda”. He went there several times during the crisis. Paul Rusesabagina, the hero portrayed in the movie, attended Gitwe Adventist Secondary School.

He reported that he had been so busy that he had not become acquainted with his neighbors but that his children played with their children day after day. A friendly rapport developed. During the crisis, this saved their lives. People stood up for them. They had some Tutsis hiding in their house. But the people protected them.

Wilkens showed pictures of the people affected by the tragedy. Seven people hid away in a friend’s bathroom for three months on meagre rations. Another man had to whisper in his place of hiding for so long that he could not speak otherwise afterwards for some time. One boy found his mother among the dead. He noticed a pulse. Got her to a hospital. Begged for them to help her. She lived.

The Adventist pastor convicted of war crimes declared his innocence until his death. Carl Wilkens knew this pastor-administrator. They had worked on church matters together. The pastor was on the opposite side of town from where Wilkens was when the church betrayal took place. The pastor went to jail. Even while in prison, he gave Bible studies to his fellow inmates. His accusers related stories of him taking certain individuals out of the church before the massacre began. Grenades were thrown into the church. As people ran to escape they were cut down, slaughtered.

The pastor’s medical doctor son drove around in a jeep with a machine gun. His complicity was obvious.

Church administrators ordered Carl to leave. Even President Folkenburg sent a personal message telling him to leave. They did not want to order him to do so, nor to violate his conscience, but that he should get out.

He stayed because people need him. He saved lives by staying. He stressed that he did not do this all alone. He worked together with others. The children and adults connected with an orphanage owe their lives to his intervention with the Prime Minister who was one of the main perpetrators of the genocide.

There were many international soldiers present in the country; the UN, etc. They could have prevented the massacres.

We asked him how the experience affected his faith in God. Before the crisis, he was a weak, insecure Christian. The crisis helped him realize that his salvation was in Jesus and that he could count on Jesus for his assurance of salvation. This awareness of salvation in Christ inspired him to live for Him.

More on Rwanda can be found at The Adventist History Library at Covenant Forum. ***HERE***

Whiter Than Snow, 1880

February 17, 2009
WHEN a flippant unbeliever accosted an earnest
evangelical preacher with an objection to his ser-
mon, and said: “Sir, I don’t like your theology.
It is all blood, blood, BLOOD! It savors of the
shambles. I like a pleasanter gospel.” The am-
bassador of Christ replied: “True, my theology
is bloody. It recognizes as its foundation the
death of Christ, with the thorn-pierced brow,
bleeding hands and open side. I am quite con-
tent that it should be bloody; for God has said:
‘ Without shedding of blood,’ there is no remission
of sins; and, ‘The blood of Jesus Christ his Son
cleanseth us from all sin.’ “

“Scarlet” sins become “white as snow.” How?
“Not by works of righteousness which we have
done.” All the dyers on earth cannot dye a red
into white. And no human merit can avail or
cleanse one crimson spot of guilt away. “By the
washing of regeneration and renewing of the
Holy Ghost,” are we justified and sanctified,
“through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,
whom God had set forth to be a propitiation
through faith in his blood.”

Of the redeemed in glory we read, “they have
washed their robes and made them white in the
blood of the Lamb.” The livery in Heaven is
white. “Fine linen, clean and white,” “white
robes,” ” white horses;” ” a white cloud,” as the
seat of the Son of man; “a great white throne”
for the Judge; “a white stone ” for the accepted
saints, who “walk in white” with him who has
made them ” worthy.” Verily, we must wear our
“white raiment” here, if we would enter there.
” They are without fault before the throne of
God.” And ” Christ also loved the Church and
gave himself for it, that he might sanctify and
cleanse it—that he might present it to himself a
glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle, or
any such thing.”

To the Fountain opened for sin and uncleanness
let us daily draw near, and take with us the
words of “the snow-prayer.” As said a happy
little girl who came in one morning to her Chris-
tian mother’s knee, after a bright race in the crisp,
freshly-fallen snow, “Mamma, I could not help
pausing while I was at play, to pray the snow-
prayer.” “What did you pray, my dear? ” asked
the interested mother. The dear child replied,
“Mamma, I said to Jesus, ‘Wash me, and I shall
be whiter than snow.”

 “Helpless and foul as the trampled snow,
Sinner, despair not, Christ stoopeth low,
To rescue the soul that was lost in sin,
And raise it to life and enjoyment again;
Groaning, bleeding, dying for thee,
The Crucified hung on the accursed tree;
His accents of mercy fell soft on thine ear—
Is there mercy for me? will he heed my prayer?
O God, in the stream that for sinners doth flow,
Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.”

—Selected.

 The Signs of the Times, February 19, 1880 (a DjVu file)
Pacific Press Publishing Association, Oakland, Ca.
(James White, J.N. Andrews, and Uriah Smith cited as the editors)

Posted also at:

(click on –>) Covenant Forum’s Adventist History Library

Storrs on Laodicea, 1844

December 25, 2008

Review and Herald, May 16, 1854

EXAMINATION OF ISAIAH II, AND MICAH IV.

… Look at the so called church of the present day. Who is she most pleased with, the humble, self- denying, cross-bearing members, who are crucified to this world, or the rich, the “respectable” in the sight of the world, and those that can make show? Which do they most regard? Is it not a fact, that the latter are more pleasing to an exalted church than the former? And are not the churches “multiplying a spurious brood of strange children?” Where is their deadness to the world, its praise and its frowns? They dare not speak out against a popular sin, nor defend an unpopular truth. Reputation is at stake, and every other principle must give place to that. Said an old pilgrim, not long since, “When our church was small and poor, we were spiritual, lively in religion, and a happy band; but now we are numerous, fashionable, and like the world, and I do not feel at home.”

The church had multiplied a spurious brood of strange children; and such is the case almost universally. Yet she is saying, like the Laodicean church, “I am rich and increased in goods and have need of nothing,”Yes, she boasts of her schools, her colleges, her theological seminaries, her talented ministry, her richly endowed institutions. In her own eyes she sits “as a queen,” and is “no widow and shall see no sorrow.” So has the world fallen in love with the church that even the soldiers, with their guns, cannons, drums and fifes, will all join with it in celebrating the birth of the Prince of Peace; and Ministers are to be educated at the Military Academy to be Chaplains in the army and navy! Truly, how much that looks like “learning war no more!”

Not only that, but our churches at Christmas and other holidays, can have exhibitions in their meetinghouses that please the children of strangers about as well as the theatre! No wonder the church of this age is talking of conquering the the world, when she herself has fairly gone over to the world, and has become like the intoxicated man who thinks the ground rises up to him when he has fallen down to that. No wonder such a church is in convulsions on hearing the dreadful sound, “Behold the Bridegroom cometh.” She wish to see him! No, she is pleasing herself with the children of strangers.

But let us inquire, what else does the prophet say of this “peace and safety” crying church? He says, [verse 7,] “Their land also is full of silver and gold, neither is there any end of their treasures.” See the thousands and millions that these churches have laid up in one form or another; either in the hands of individual members, or corporate bodies; if possible to show their contempt of him” who though he was rich, for our sakes became poor;” acting as if their greatest desire was to be independent of God himself, and showing that they have no confidence in him…

— Geo. Storrs, in Mid. Cry 1844

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1854-V05-17/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=3