Archive for the ‘Soul Winning’ Category

1852, A Paper For Children

April 25, 2009

Review and Herald, July 8, 1852, page 5

A PAPER FOR CHILDREN

WE design publishing a small monthly paper, containing matter for the benefit of the youth. And we are satisfied that our brethren and sisters will agree with us, that something of the kind is very much needed. The children should have a paper of their own, one that will interest and instruct them.

God is at work among the children who have believing parents, or guardians, and many of them are being converted, and they need to be instructed in the present truth. And there are a portion of the children who have believing parents, or guardians, who are neglected, and do not have right instruction, consequently, they do not manifest much interest for their own salvation. We trust that such a paper as we design publishing would interest such children, and also be the means of waking up their parents, or guardians to a sense of their important duty. On them rests the awful responsibility of training souls for the kingdorn of God. But it is a lamentable fact that many of their children are left without suitable instruction. We feel more on this subject than we can express. May God wake up his people to a sense of their duty to those young minds, intrusted to their care, to guide in the channel of virtue and holiness.

We intend to give four or five lessons, in the form of questions and answers, in each number, one for each week for Sabbath-School lessons. These Schools can be held where there are but two or three children as well as where there are more.

We invite our brethren and sisters, also our young friends, to furnish matter, original or selected, for the little paper. Let all be free to write. Communicate your thoughts with simplicity and clearness, with a heart that feels the condition of the tender, yet neglected youth, that must soon witness the day of the Lord. We hope that matter for the first number will be sent in immediately, as we wish to prepare it before we leave for our Eastern tour.

We publish this paper on our own responsibility, and think it duty to set the price at twenty five cents for a volume of twelve numbers, to be paid in advance, or within three months from the date of the first number.

Will some brother in each place, obtain all the names of the children that desire the paper, collect the means to pay for it, and forward it to us.

The paper will cost, including postage, only about three cents a month. Many little boys and girls spend enongh for candies and toys, that are of no real value, to pay for five or six such papers. We mean that all the children that cannot pay for it, who wish to read it, shall have it free, and we have no doubt but many of the children will deny themselves of toys, so as to be able to pay for their own, and some poor little boys’ or girls’ paper. We hope our young friends will do what they can, and we will try to give them an interesting and instructive little sheet.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1852-V03-05/index.djvu?djvuopts&page= 5

1894, Lord Opened Way to Trinidad, Adamson

March 18, 2009

1894, Charles Adamson in Trinidad

Review and Herald, March 6, 1894, p. 9

THE WEST INDIES

Windward and Leeward Groups.

AFTER Elder D. A. Ball left me in Antigua, I endeavored to put in my time in the sale of books, and in holding public meetings in the different villages; and while I enjoyed God’s blessing in my feeble efforts there, I longed to go to the island ol Trinidad. This became a burden to me. I placed the matter before the Lord, and he opened the way for me to go in a most wonderful manner. After many fruitless efforts, I secured $24,— all I could call my own in this world,—and Oct. 9, 1893, my family and I sailed for Barbadoes. I remained here two months, giving all the time I could to the dear brethren. The little company here are living on
the promises of God, and are full of the glorious hope.

I left my family here, and sailed Oct. 12 for Granada. This, is an island 100 miles from Barbadoos. Landing at Greenville, the second town, I remained seven days, and sold three “Bible Headings.” The majority of the people in this island are Roman Catholics. I left here Oct. 22 for Trinidad, landing on that island the 25th. Port-of-Spain, the capital, is a city of nearly 4000 inhabitants, with all modern improvements. I found four Sabbath-keepers here, and sold three books.

Nov. 22 I took the train for San Fernando, the second seaport town on the island, twenty-five miles from Port-of-Spain. I met many at this place who sighed after something pure ; they earnestly asked for some one to instruct them in the way of truth. There are six here who are deeply interested. I sold two books. From here I went to Princetown, and visited the correspondents of the International Tract Society. They are very grateful for the reading-matter sent them. A tailor signed the covenant to obey and live. I returned to Port-of-Spain, Nov. 9, visited the dear ones, and showed them the necessity of assembling together. On the 12th we formed a Sabbath-school of five members, all full of bright hopes.

Nov. 25 I brought my family from Barbadoes. I cannot begin to tell how much we have enjoyed God’s blessing. Our needs are all supplied, and truly light is increasing on our pathway. Our Sabbath-school has increased from five to nine. The greatest number of the people here, especially the upper class, are Roman Catholics. The Freethinkers have a society, and Atheism and Universalism also flourish. There are about 80,000 Hindus, who are the contract laborers. The Canadian Mission is doing a good work for them, and there are many among this people who are thirsting after truth. May the Lord enable us to do something for them soon for us and for the effort here.

CHARLES D. ADAMSON.

Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1894-10/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=9

1894, Kneeland’s Christmas on Trinidad

March 18, 2009

Review and Herald, February 13, 1894, p. 4

OPEN DOORS IN TRINIDAD.

As our boat was detained in the harbor of Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, over Christmas, we improved the opportunity by going on shore and making the acquaintance of some of the persons with whom the International Tract and Missionary Society had been in correspondence.

When it was known that we were there in the interests of the tract society, we had no lack for friends, and we were gladly welcomed by all. Some had been receiving the Signs and other publications, which they had eagerly read and circulated ; in some instances carrying them on foot twenty miles to their friends. In this way very many had heard something of our work, and as a result, one family had begun the observance of the Sabbath, and others are convinced. This brother belonged to the Church of England, and as they were unable to convince him that he was in error, they expelled him from their midst. This incident only increased the discussion of the Sabbath question, and many questions were asked us on this subject. We tried to show them that Christians should honor Christ by keeping his law.

Services were desired before we left, and the Baptist mission building was kindly offered us. Christmas day with this people is wholly given up to amusements; but the invitation sent out soon gathered in quite a company, who gave good attention as we tried to present a few thoughts from Rom. 1 : 16.

G. W. KNEELAND.

Georgetown, British Guiana.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1894-07/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=4

1892, Chadwick Visits Trinidad and British Guiana

March 17, 2009

1892, Spring, L. C. Chadwick Reports

Review and Herald, June 21, 1892, p. 12

TRINIDAD AND BRITISH GUIANA

AFTER my last report, I spent a few days at Trinidad, Where “nothing has ever been done in the interests of the present truth, except that brother Arnold is now delivering large numbers of ”Great Controversy,” and the International Tract Society is commencing a correspondence, which is showing good results. This is a beautiful island, and one in which ministerial labor should soon be begun. As I visit these fields, and see the open doors before us on every hand, my heart goes out in prayer for our people to awaken to the responsibility that rests on us to support our foreign work, that we may extend it into all these islands and other countries toward which we have hardly turned our attention. There are about seventy thousand Hindus in Trinidad, or about one third of the population. Many of them have received a knowledge of the true God, and we should be doing something for them.

I spent twenty-two days in British Guiana, from April 27 to May 19. Five years ago Elder G. G. Rupert labored here two months, and brother Geo. King sold some books. A small church was organized. Last year brother Arnold sold several hundred books in the colony, which has a population of about three hundred thousand, of whom one third are Hindus. The church has struggled along under difficulties, among which has been a division in their own numbers; but in the face of all these, others have received the truth, and there has never been so widespread an interest to know more of the message, as there is at the present time.

My labors were bestowed chiefly upon the church and the believers. By the blessing of God, differences vanished, hearts were united, and I believe that much good was accomplished. I went out eighty-five miles in the country, held a few meetings, and baptized eight, and later sixteen were baptized in Georgetown, of whom three were Hindus. The church was strengthened, and I left it with a membership of forty-one. The officers were unanimously chosen, and we felt that the Lord sanctioned the service when the elder and deacons were set apart for their work, with prayer and laying on of hands. At the farewell service, we celebrated the ordinances, and it was a time of refreshing. If all continue to walk in unity and love, the influence of the cause may be greatly extended. This is an important field, and we should have one minister located in this colony, to develop the interest that now exists.

L. C. CHADWICK.

1994, Rwanda, Carl Wilkens’ Story

March 5, 2009

“Carl Wilkens is the former head of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International in Rwanda. In 1994, he was the only American who chose to remain in the country after the genocide began. His choice to stay and try to help resulted in preventing the massacre of hundreds of children over the course of the genocide.”

The World Outside My Shoes Speaking Tour

Carl Wilkens visited our Religion 11 class March 4. In preparation for his visit, we studied the various news accounts of the Rwandan genocide, watched “Hotel Rwanda”, and examined the Adventist connections to the event, both positive and negative.

At some point we hope to report on what Carl Wilkens shared in detail. He proved to be an effective communicator. For our class of ninety minutes, the interaction between the students and Mr. Wilkens remained focused and lively.

He used Google Earth to show the geographical setting. He mentioned Hôtel des Mille Collines of “Hotel Rwanda”. He went there several times during the crisis. Paul Rusesabagina, the hero portrayed in the movie, attended Gitwe Adventist Secondary School.

He reported that he had been so busy that he had not become acquainted with his neighbors but that his children played with their children day after day. A friendly rapport developed. During the crisis, this saved their lives. People stood up for them. They had some Tutsis hiding in their house. But the people protected them.

Wilkens showed pictures of the people affected by the tragedy. Seven people hid away in a friend’s bathroom for three months on meagre rations. Another man had to whisper in his place of hiding for so long that he could not speak otherwise afterwards for some time. One boy found his mother among the dead. He noticed a pulse. Got her to a hospital. Begged for them to help her. She lived.

The Adventist pastor convicted of war crimes declared his innocence until his death. Carl Wilkens knew this pastor-administrator. They had worked on church matters together. The pastor was on the opposite side of town from where Wilkens was when the church betrayal took place. The pastor went to jail. Even while in prison, he gave Bible studies to his fellow inmates. His accusers related stories of him taking certain individuals out of the church before the massacre began. Grenades were thrown into the church. As people ran to escape they were cut down, slaughtered.

The pastor’s medical doctor son drove around in a jeep with a machine gun. His complicity was obvious.

Church administrators ordered Carl to leave. Even President Folkenburg sent a personal message telling him to leave. They did not want to order him to do so, nor to violate his conscience, but that he should get out.

He stayed because people need him. He saved lives by staying. He stressed that he did not do this all alone. He worked together with others. The children and adults connected with an orphanage owe their lives to his intervention with the Prime Minister who was one of the main perpetrators of the genocide.

There were many international soldiers present in the country; the UN, etc. They could have prevented the massacres.

We asked him how the experience affected his faith in God. Before the crisis, he was a weak, insecure Christian. The crisis helped him realize that his salvation was in Jesus and that he could count on Jesus for his assurance of salvation. This awareness of salvation in Christ inspired him to live for Him.

More on Rwanda can be found at The Adventist History Library at Covenant Forum. ***HERE***

Evangelist Cudney, Nebraska, 1881

December 21, 2008

cudney-evangelist-18811

— Source, Review and Herald, January 4, 1881, page 10

Smith and Lewis in Correspondence, 1859

December 18, 2008

Note that Uriah Smith refers to A.H. Lewis as Bro. Lewis. Lewis was the main Seventh day Baptist spokesperson during the 1800’s. This 1859 interaction captures a time when SDA’s were less in number than SDB’s; a time when Adventists had an extremely limited view of their mission to the world.

Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, February 3, 1859, page 7

From Bro, Lewis.

BRO. SMITH : In accordance with the suggestion of Bro. J. Clarke in the Review, No. 8, I embrace this opportunity to communicate with your readers, if, perchance, what I may say shall be found worthy a place in your columns.

I commenced reading the Review some three or four years since, for two reasons: I wished to learn something of those who supported it, and advocated its doctrines, and felt willing to receive any new light upon the all-important subject of our lives. Upon the question of the Sabbath I had no inclination to disagree with you, as I had always observed it ; other points I did not embrace at once. I thought them quite consistent, yet I never saw them in their true light until, with the Bible for my guide, I sought God in prayer for light to see his truth, and I now bless his holy name that I ever heard the three messages, the counsel of the faithful and true Witness, the immortality of man as brought to light in the Bible, &c., &c. But for meeting with Bro. Steward, of Mauston, and the Review when I did, in my boyish incredulity I doubt not but I should long since have renounced the Bible, and now have been attempting to “climb up” by some theory of speculative philosophy; and whatever may be the end of the Review or of Adventism, thus far I feel that it stopped me and brought me back to the sure guide of the world, the Bible.

There are but few here who call themselves Adventists, yet I believe there are not a few who are willing to keep all God’s commands and serve him in all his appointed ways. The Seventh-day Baptists are the leading denomination in our immediate neighborhood ; yet there are many around and among us who observe Constantine’s Sabbath instead of that of the Lord. But I trust God has yet good laid up in store for his children in Berlin, I sometimes try to vindicate the truths of God’s word here on the Sabbath. yet a press of other, duties, of a literary nature, make it impossible for me to study or reflect much, and my own weakness, and at times want of faith, seem to retard any effort in any great degree for good. A few seem alive to God, and the interests of his kingdom, yet many around us (especially those who do not keep the Sabbath) seem too much inclined to seek only a form of godliness without the power. O, that God would not say of us as he did of Ephraim but would send us light and give us hearts to receive it. Allow me a question to yourself or some of your correspondents :

Is the Third Angel’s Message being given, or to be given except in the United States? Yours striving to overcome.

A. H. LEWIS.

Berlin, Wis., Jan. 22d, 1859.

NOTE. — We have no information that the Third Message is at present being proclaimed in any country besides our own. Analogy would lead us to expect that the proclamation of this message would be coextensive with the first : though this might not perhaps be necessary to fulfill Rev. x, 11, since our own land is composed of people from almost every nation. — ED.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH18590203-V13-11/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=7

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lewis-ah1

Profile of A.H. Lewis

Fishers of Men

November 6, 2008

Union Conference Record, Australasian, November 23, 1908

Believing that Jesus is speaking to us as individuals in the verse quoted (Matt. 4: 19), let us read it as if addressed to each person separately : ” Follow Me, and I will make you a fisher of men.”

Now you would not consider yourself a fisherman if you always remained at home and sent your father or brother away with hook and line, or net, to do the actual work of catching fish. So another command comes to us from the Master:—

“Go ye out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in.”

It you are to be a fisher of men, you are to go where active service is to be done in winning them from sin to the love of Christ.

The genuine fisherman enjoys selecting the best fishing-rod and the finest reel ; he looks with pride upon his collection of tempting bait. But the keenest pleasure comes when he wades’ into the swift-flowing stream, casts the hook into the foaming water, and feels the tug of resistance as the bait is taken. There is a thrill of satisfaction as, with the skill of experience and careful study, he finally lands the finny captive upon the bank.

Meade MacGuire