Archive for the ‘Faith in Jesus’ Category

Edwin L. Minchin, Revivalist

April 19, 2009

Ministry, March 1959, page 11

Revival and the Responsibility of the Ministry

E. L. MINCHIN

Associate Secretary, General Conference Missionary Volunteer Department

THERE is no greater or 1 more solemn commission given to the ministry than that of bringing, under the leadership of the Holy Spirit, the promised and greatly needed revival of spiritual life and power to our people. The servant of God has told us that this is “the greatest and most urgent of all our needs. To seek this should be our first work.”—Selected Messages, vol. I, p. 121. Without it the work cannot be finished. Without it the church would be unprepared for translation. With it God will cut short His work in righteousness. O that we would delay no longer in bringing to our trusting people this deep and more truly spiritual ministry! Our people are hungry. They rightly look to us for such leadership. They are disappointed when we fail to give it. The dangers of worldly compromise, the needs of our youth in this hour of peril, solemnly challenge the ministry.

We do not need to reproduce here the many unequivocal statements of the Bible on what God intends to do for His people when the way is prepared. The promised “outpouring of the Holy Spirit,” “the latter rain,” “the loud cry,” are expressions familiar to all of us. Ever since I was a child I have heard our ministers preach and pray concerning it. I have longed that I might be privileged to share in that last glorious display of God’s power on this earth, when we are told that the scenes of Pentecost will be eclipsed. But as yet the promise of its fullness has not been fulfilled.

We have been told that “when the way is prepared for the Spirit of God, the blessing will come.”—Ibid., p. 124. Here is the key to the blessing of heaven. Here is the secret of power. Here is the explanation for our failures of the past and of the present. The entire story of the Bible is a history of revival. Read the story of that mighty revival recorded in 2 Chronicles 15. The people sinned. They became like the people around them and served other gods. God raised up His messenger and through him spoke messages of love and power. What happened? They were convicted. They put away their idols. They raised an altar to the Lord and had some great meetings. The people came from all around, even from other countries, when they saw that the Lord was with them. Make no mistake, the hunger of the soul for God is universal. When the glory of the Lord is manifested and the fire is on the altar, when sin is put away and Christ the Saviour is made Lord, the crowds will come and mighty revivals will take place.

The Men God Uses

When God finds truly humble and dedi- cated instruments who are willing to pay the price that a truly spiritual ministry demands, He has mighty weapons in His hand for the breaking down of strongholds and the establishing of His kingdom in the hearts of men. The greatest preparation for any revival must take place in the hearts of the instruments God will use. It is the preacher’s inner life that matters most, and argely determines the success or failure of any revival. It is not his education, his cul- ture, or his organizing ability, important as they may be. If he is a born-again servant of God, and has a passionate love for Christ; if he has a tender and understanding heart in his dealing with souls, and a growing love for and familiarity with the Word of God; if he is an unworldly man whom the people know comes to his task from the higher levels of fellowship and communion with God, a vitalizing power will attend his ministry. If he does not have this his ministry becomes mediocre and ineffective. Successful ministry is costly. It is a spiritual work. Find a man who will diligently cultivate his own soul and you will have an instrument of power. Otherwise, we merely preach but we do not woo. We talk, but nothing happens. We pass multitudes of resolutions, but nobody quakes. There is no vital movement toward God. The simple fact is this: when for any reason we become separated from the God we vowed to serve, we cease to become effective channels of His grace to His people. Then let the fire fall. Let the cleansing, energizing power of the Holy Spirit take possession of us. Let Jesus Christ and His will become the passion of our lives. Let self-glory vanish and the blessing will come, and the fires of true revival will be kindled in every land.

Revival Methods

During the last four years it has been my privilege to minister to thousands of our youth and our people in revival efforts in twelve cities, and in our colleges and academies in North America as well as in other lands. We give praise to our heavenly Father for what we have seen, especially among our youth. Surely one of the most heartening things that we see in all God’s work today is the response in the hearts of our young people to the call of God.

As these were youth-centered revivals, we have worked through the union and local Missionary Volunteer secretaries in preparing for and organizing the meetings. They in turn worked closely with the conference president and local pastor. It is impossible to overestimate the importance of the local pastor’s influence in the promoting of the revival. His vision, support, and participation are essential to its success and to the follow-up.

We have followed the plan of holding meetings for nine-night periods, from Friday night until the Saturday night a week later, in a center where a number of churches could combine. The organization of Friendship Teams among our young people and members at least six weeks before our meetings were to begin, has been a special feature and especially “blessed by the Lord.

Prior to our crusade in Los Angles, Desmond Cummings, the MV secretary of the Southern California Conference, followed a plan of Friendship Team participation that produced remarkable results. In the city of Chicago, three weeks before the meetings began, more than 1,100 former Seventh-day Adventists and discouraged church members were being visited by members of the Friendship Teams. In the more recent Orlando, Florida, effort there were 60 Friendship Teams contacting more than 200 former members. Many times our hearts have been blessed and stirred by the sight of scores of our consecrated teen-agers and young people bringing their needy friends to the meetings and coming forward with them when the call was made. We have had the joy of seeing hundreds of back-sliders reclaimed, sin put away, and families reunited in a new and tender relationship of love to each other and to their Lord.

The Sabbath prior to the recent Orlando, Florida, effort, was a day of fasting and prayer. The churches held all-day services of intercession for the meetings. Hundreds, both old and voung, devoted the day to prayer and heart-searching. We are told that “a revival need be expected only in an- swer to prayer/’—Ibid., p. 121. There is no substitute for prayer. Real praying involves an outlay of time and effort that flesh and blood does not like. It is a spiritual work. Let the ministers lead the people into an experience of deep heart-searching and prevailing prayer, and results must come. “Only the work accomplished with much prayer, and sanctified by the merit of Christ, will in the end prove to have been efficient for good.”—The Desire of Ages, p. 362.

I am sure that no one in Orlando who attended those prayer seasons fully realized what was going to happen. The way indeed was prepared and the blessing came. Increasing and unprecedented crowds of up to 1,500 packed the Orlando central church each night. The meetings were extended by urgent request. The presence of God was felt in a powerful way, especially in the hearts of our youth who came from Forest Lake Academy and the surrounding churches. The last Saturday night witnessed a Pentecostal season in a meeting that lasted nearly four hours. It was impossible to close it. Great and marvelous victories were won in the hearts of our youth, many of whom were in very great need. Strong men wept as they saw and felt the power of God working upon the hearts of our youth. Surely this is not the work of man. Who among us has power to convict of sin and to turn sinners to righteousness? It is God’s doing and it is marvelous in our eyes. Let us be careful lest we take the glory that be- longs to Him, or treat lightly the work of the Holy Spirit upon human hearts.

Someone might say that we have to be careful about emotionalism. That is true, but there is a vast difference between emotionalism and godly emotion. We cannot have too little of the former and too much of the latter. A godly sorrow for sin touches the emotions. Our Saviour wept for sinners and His heart bled and was broken for a lost world. Brethren, our hearts also must bleed if we would be ministers of the saving power of Christ’s blood. Tearless hearts can never be heralds of the passion of Him who “offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears” (Heb. 5:7).

We follow the plan in most of the meet- ings of either making an altar call or of holding an after-meeting. Altar calls are made when the Spirit of conviction is markedly present. Sometimes an invitation is given for those who feel their need and who wish to stay for an after-season of prayer to come to the prayer room during the singing of the last hymn. It is in these after-services where much of the real work of the campaign is done. Here we come into a closer, more intimate contact with those who are needing help. The pastors meet with us. Decision cards are used for follow-up work. If any wish personal help the pastors take them aside right there in the church or in some anteroom for counseling and prayer. What blessed seasons, what reaching out to the Lord, what victories claimed by faith have been experienced in these after-services. During the week the pastors and local workers meet each morning for an hour of prayer, heart-searching, and Bible study. The rest of the day is given to visitation in the homes of those especially in need of help and to those in the academy and church school.

The final Saturday night is devoted to praise and testimony. These meetings have been among the most powerful and blessed of all. A distinct blessing comes to those who have found a new experience in Christ when they give expression to their faith and love in testimonies of praise. Frequently many more decisions have been secured as we have used the earnest testimony of some youth who has found Christ anew as a basis of appeals to others in the audience. We need to use the personal testimony method more than we do. There is power in it. The servant of God calls upon every youth who loves the Lord to confess Him before his fellow youth. “Tell them how you found Jesus and how blessed you have been since you gained an experience in His service. Tell them what blessing comes to you as you sit at the feet of Jesus and learn precious lessons from His word.

Tell them of the gladness and joy that there is in the Christian life. . . . This is genuine missionary work, and as it is done, many will awake as from a dream.”—Testimonies, vol. 9, p. 48.

Yes, brethren, “many will awake as from a dream.” We have seen this happen time and time again. During the final service of testimony in one recent campaign, a well- known youth who had wandered far from Christ came to the microphone and gave a broken and heartfelt testimony of his decision to turn from a life of sin and follow Christ all the way. Previously he had held back largely because of his companions. Now an appeal was made to his buddies in the audience to join him, to finish with sin and disobedience and with him confess Christ as their Saviour. More than twenty lads were soon on the platform beside him, some of whom were sobbing and under deep conviction. The personal testimony and witness of one youth did a work in the hearts of others that all the sermons of the previous week had failed to do. Scores were awakened “as from a dream.” It was a Pen- tecostal season. Hours after the meeting closed, youth tarried in the church with anxious hearts, wanting to know how to find Christ and get right with Him.

The Science of Preaching

The work of preaching and of soul win- ning, especially among youth, is a science so deep and so vast that we cry out, “Who of us, O Lord, is sufficient for these things?” I have not written of anything or told of any methods that are new to our men. What must be new among us is to be found in our hearts. If we would be God’s instru- ments, the fire must be kindled anew there. It is the atmosphere of spirituality around the preacher, the warm throb of his heart, his yearning for the souls of his people, his deep understanding of the longings, of the failures, and of the needs of his flock that gives his words power and wings them home to the hearts of his hearers. Fortunate the congregations who get such ministers.

Then, too, our great need is simplicity in presenting the love of God in Christ to our people. There is no substitute for this. “To invest the simplest truths with novelty and singularity, is to rob them of their power to win souls to Christ.”—Sons and Daugh- ters of God, p. 266. Let us shun the spectacular and the novel and hold to the simple, direct preaching of Christ and the Word. In music let us discard the superficial and the showy and hold to the grand old hymns and songs of the cross, of Zion, and of Christian experience. Many of the greatest hymns of the Christian church were born in times of mighty spiritual awakening when men’s souls were stirred to deep devotion to Christ.

If we would see sinners brought to the foot of the cross and the saints established in holy living we must preach on the great themes of the Bible. J. H. Jowett once said, “Our visions always determine the quality of our tasks.” Too often the preacher’s vision is limited because he has not, like Isaiah, seen “the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up” (Isa. 6:1); consequently his sermons are inadequate for the desperate needs of his flock. Let the great themes of the love of God in Christ, repentance, forgiveness, justification, sanctification, a full salvation through Jesus Christ, and His glorious return be presented. No sentimental preaching of the gospel, no preaching merely of lofty idealism will bring healing and salvation to the people. We are warned against this type of preaching. “The Lord desired His servants today to preach the old gospel doctrine, sorrow for sin, repentance, and confession. We want old-fashioned sermons, old-fashioned customs, old- fashioned fathers and mothers in Israel. The sinner must be labored for, perseveringly, earnestly, wisely, until he shall see that he is a transgressor of God’s law, and shall exercise repentance toward God, and faith toward the Lord Jesus Christ.”— Selected Messages, vol. 2, p. 19.

This precious Advent message was born in one of the greatest revivals in history. It will close in the mightiest revival of all time. Brethren, our task is a holy one. It is an imperative one. Thousands of our youth and of our people must be brought to realize that “a mere profession of Christ is not enough to prepare one to stand the test of the Judgment” (Ellen G. White in The Review and Herald, Jan. 25, 1887), and that “only those who are clothed in the garments of His righteousness will be able to endure the glory of His presence when He shall appear with ‘power and great glory.’ “— ELLEN G. WHITE in The Review and Her- ald, July 9, 1908.

In the last message the servant of God sent to the General Conference, in 1913, she says, “I have been deeply impressed by scenes that have recently passed before me in the night season. There seemed to be a great movement—a work of revival—going forward in many places. Our people were moving into line, responding to God’s call.” —Testimonies to Ministers, p. 515. Could the scenes we are witnessing in places here and there on the earth today be a part of that greater movement, that work of revival and reformation which the servant of God foresaw forty-six years ago? This work is long overdue. The power of Pentecost is our supreme need. May we, His servants, not fail Him or His people in this last solemn hour.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/MIN/MIN1959-03/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=11

1894, Kneeland’s Christmas on Trinidad

March 18, 2009

Review and Herald, February 13, 1894, p. 4

OPEN DOORS IN TRINIDAD.

As our boat was detained in the harbor of Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, over Christmas, we improved the opportunity by going on shore and making the acquaintance of some of the persons with whom the International Tract and Missionary Society had been in correspondence.

When it was known that we were there in the interests of the tract society, we had no lack for friends, and we were gladly welcomed by all. Some had been receiving the Signs and other publications, which they had eagerly read and circulated ; in some instances carrying them on foot twenty miles to their friends. In this way very many had heard something of our work, and as a result, one family had begun the observance of the Sabbath, and others are convinced. This brother belonged to the Church of England, and as they were unable to convince him that he was in error, they expelled him from their midst. This incident only increased the discussion of the Sabbath question, and many questions were asked us on this subject. We tried to show them that Christians should honor Christ by keeping his law.

Services were desired before we left, and the Baptist mission building was kindly offered us. Christmas day with this people is wholly given up to amusements; but the invitation sent out soon gathered in quite a company, who gave good attention as we tried to present a few thoughts from Rom. 1 : 16.

G. W. KNEELAND.

Georgetown, British Guiana.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1894-07/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=4

1879, The First Idea, Youth Work

March 7, 2009

The First Idea

The beginning of the Junior Missionary Volunteer Society can be traced back to the summer of 1879. The historical spot was a country S.D.A. church at Hazelton, Michigan. The community is known today as Juddville and is located just southwest of Flint, Michigan. A few days before this first J.M.V. Society was organized, Elder Luther Warren, then a lad in his teens, and his friend Harry Fenner were talking earnestly as they walked along a country road. They conceived the idea of having a boys’ society; and before parting they climbed over a rail fence, went to a corner in the field where the bushes were thick, and told the Lord about their plans. Of this society Elder Warren says:

“There were only about six or eight of us at the first meeting, and we were some- what diffident and backward in trying to carrj’ on religious exercises together; but we tried to do things according to our ideas of order. We elected officers—a president and a secretary-treasurer. The meeting was opened with prayer and song, and we en- deavored to conform to parliamentary rules in the transaction of business.

“At our weekly meetings the work done was reported—papers and tracts given away, missionary letters written and received, and other work of like character. A temperance pledge against the use of alcohol, tobacco, tea, coffee, and pork -was drawn up and signed. Our collections were used to buy literature, except the small amount needed for record books and running expenses.

“A short time later someone suggested that a number of the girls desired to join us in our work, and after some discussion it was decided to invite them to unite with us in our meetings and work. After this our plans were somewhat enlarged. We held prayer and social meetings, missionary meetings, and temperance meetings, with special programs.

“The boys’ meetings were held with none of the older folks present; but after the girls joined us, the meetings were held in the open family room and were usually attended by the adults of the family where the meeting was held.”—Missionary Volunteers and Their Work, p. 10.

The Church Officer Gazette, September, 1950, page 15

Missionary Volunteers And Their Work: Prepared For The Young People’s Missionary Volunteer Department of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists by MATILDA ERICKSON by Matilda Erickson (Hardcover – 1926)

Luther Warren and Harry Fenner

March 7, 2009

warren-and-fenner

Harry Fenner and Luther Warren asked God’s blessing in organizing the youth for service.

Robert Ayres, artist

In 1879 a beginning was made by two boys of Hazelton, Michigan. One was Harry Fenner, seventeen, and the other was four-teen-year-old Luther Warren, who later became an evangelist. They were troubled about the needs of the young people of their church, and developed the idea of having a boys’ society. They walked down a country road one day, talking earnestly about their young friends. Before parting, the two boys went to a secluded corner in a field and prayed about their plans. Thus was born the first Seventh-day Adventist young people’s society on record. It consisted of five or six boys, and the meetings were held in the home of one of the members. They elected a president and a secretary-treasurer. The activities emphasized were missionary work and the improvement of personal conduct, especially healthful living. Later the girls of the church desired to join the boys in their work, and after some discussion they were invited to do so. Other societies of young people soon sprang up in Nebraska, Iowa, Ohio, and Australia. Messages began coming from Ellen White urging the young people to organize for service.

The Story of Our Church (1956), page 458, A General Conference Education Department secondary school textbook.

1994, Rwanda, Carl Wilkens’ Story

March 5, 2009

“Carl Wilkens is the former head of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International in Rwanda. In 1994, he was the only American who chose to remain in the country after the genocide began. His choice to stay and try to help resulted in preventing the massacre of hundreds of children over the course of the genocide.”

The World Outside My Shoes Speaking Tour

Carl Wilkens visited our Religion 11 class March 4. In preparation for his visit, we studied the various news accounts of the Rwandan genocide, watched “Hotel Rwanda”, and examined the Adventist connections to the event, both positive and negative.

At some point we hope to report on what Carl Wilkens shared in detail. He proved to be an effective communicator. For our class of ninety minutes, the interaction between the students and Mr. Wilkens remained focused and lively.

He used Google Earth to show the geographical setting. He mentioned Hôtel des Mille Collines of “Hotel Rwanda”. He went there several times during the crisis. Paul Rusesabagina, the hero portrayed in the movie, attended Gitwe Adventist Secondary School.

He reported that he had been so busy that he had not become acquainted with his neighbors but that his children played with their children day after day. A friendly rapport developed. During the crisis, this saved their lives. People stood up for them. They had some Tutsis hiding in their house. But the people protected them.

Wilkens showed pictures of the people affected by the tragedy. Seven people hid away in a friend’s bathroom for three months on meagre rations. Another man had to whisper in his place of hiding for so long that he could not speak otherwise afterwards for some time. One boy found his mother among the dead. He noticed a pulse. Got her to a hospital. Begged for them to help her. She lived.

The Adventist pastor convicted of war crimes declared his innocence until his death. Carl Wilkens knew this pastor-administrator. They had worked on church matters together. The pastor was on the opposite side of town from where Wilkens was when the church betrayal took place. The pastor went to jail. Even while in prison, he gave Bible studies to his fellow inmates. His accusers related stories of him taking certain individuals out of the church before the massacre began. Grenades were thrown into the church. As people ran to escape they were cut down, slaughtered.

The pastor’s medical doctor son drove around in a jeep with a machine gun. His complicity was obvious.

Church administrators ordered Carl to leave. Even President Folkenburg sent a personal message telling him to leave. They did not want to order him to do so, nor to violate his conscience, but that he should get out.

He stayed because people need him. He saved lives by staying. He stressed that he did not do this all alone. He worked together with others. The children and adults connected with an orphanage owe their lives to his intervention with the Prime Minister who was one of the main perpetrators of the genocide.

There were many international soldiers present in the country; the UN, etc. They could have prevented the massacres.

We asked him how the experience affected his faith in God. Before the crisis, he was a weak, insecure Christian. The crisis helped him realize that his salvation was in Jesus and that he could count on Jesus for his assurance of salvation. This awareness of salvation in Christ inspired him to live for Him.

More on Rwanda can be found at The Adventist History Library at Covenant Forum. ***HERE***

Whiter Than Snow, 1880

February 17, 2009
WHEN a flippant unbeliever accosted an earnest
evangelical preacher with an objection to his ser-
mon, and said: “Sir, I don’t like your theology.
It is all blood, blood, BLOOD! It savors of the
shambles. I like a pleasanter gospel.” The am-
bassador of Christ replied: “True, my theology
is bloody. It recognizes as its foundation the
death of Christ, with the thorn-pierced brow,
bleeding hands and open side. I am quite con-
tent that it should be bloody; for God has said:
‘ Without shedding of blood,’ there is no remission
of sins; and, ‘The blood of Jesus Christ his Son
cleanseth us from all sin.’ “

“Scarlet” sins become “white as snow.” How?
“Not by works of righteousness which we have
done.” All the dyers on earth cannot dye a red
into white. And no human merit can avail or
cleanse one crimson spot of guilt away. “By the
washing of regeneration and renewing of the
Holy Ghost,” are we justified and sanctified,
“through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,
whom God had set forth to be a propitiation
through faith in his blood.”

Of the redeemed in glory we read, “they have
washed their robes and made them white in the
blood of the Lamb.” The livery in Heaven is
white. “Fine linen, clean and white,” “white
robes,” ” white horses;” ” a white cloud,” as the
seat of the Son of man; “a great white throne”
for the Judge; “a white stone ” for the accepted
saints, who “walk in white” with him who has
made them ” worthy.” Verily, we must wear our
“white raiment” here, if we would enter there.
” They are without fault before the throne of
God.” And ” Christ also loved the Church and
gave himself for it, that he might sanctify and
cleanse it—that he might present it to himself a
glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle, or
any such thing.”

To the Fountain opened for sin and uncleanness
let us daily draw near, and take with us the
words of “the snow-prayer.” As said a happy
little girl who came in one morning to her Chris-
tian mother’s knee, after a bright race in the crisp,
freshly-fallen snow, “Mamma, I could not help
pausing while I was at play, to pray the snow-
prayer.” “What did you pray, my dear? ” asked
the interested mother. The dear child replied,
“Mamma, I said to Jesus, ‘Wash me, and I shall
be whiter than snow.”

 “Helpless and foul as the trampled snow,
Sinner, despair not, Christ stoopeth low,
To rescue the soul that was lost in sin,
And raise it to life and enjoyment again;
Groaning, bleeding, dying for thee,
The Crucified hung on the accursed tree;
His accents of mercy fell soft on thine ear—
Is there mercy for me? will he heed my prayer?
O God, in the stream that for sinners doth flow,
Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.”

—Selected.

 The Signs of the Times, February 19, 1880 (a DjVu file)
Pacific Press Publishing Association, Oakland, Ca.
(James White, J.N. Andrews, and Uriah Smith cited as the editors)

Posted also at:

(click on –>) Covenant Forum’s Adventist History Library

Blessed Jesus, Meek and Lowly – Annie Smith, c. 1853

January 1, 2009

Hymns and Tunes, #501

blessed-jesus-meek-and-lowly1

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/HT/Hymns%20and%20Tunes/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=163

Luther Prays for Melancthon, RH 1859

January 1, 2009

Review and Herald, January 6, 1859

luther-and-mel-rh-01-06-1859

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH18590106-V13-07/index.djvu

A FORM FOR RECORDING CHURCH BUSINESS

December 22, 2008

Review and Herald, May 9, 1878, page 7

A FORM FOR RECORDING CHURCH BUSINESS.

As many of the clerks of our churches have had but little experience in recording business meetings, they are frequently embarrassed to know how to go to work. This article is written to assist such persons. If they will study it carefully, and preserve it for reference, they can soon learn to record a meeting properly in the clerk’s book.

I was much pleased and edified by the “Business School” held at this place (Sigourney, Iowa) by Elds. Canright and Farnsworth. I am fully satisfied that every church, as well as our scattered brethren throughout the land, would be greatly benefited by such a course of training on the organization and business transactions of our churches. But as a great majority cannot avail themselves of the benefits of such instruction, it has occurred to me that a concise statement of the workings and business transactions of this school, published through the REVIEW, might be of service to many.

At the suggestion of those who had charge of the school, I will try to furnish a chapter.

There were about fifty persons convened in a comfortable meeting-house, and the exercises were conducted much after the style of a teachers’ institute, Elds. Canright and Farnsworth having charge. Each person was expected to keep a record of all business transacted, and in turn these records were examined, criticised, and corrected by the managers.

We had a church organized and business transacted by it, the object being to learn the art of doing church business and keeping church records. It is very evident that the business of our churches is often bunglingly done, and the records are sadly deficient. The following is supposed to be a form of business that might occur at and after the organization of a church society:—

A company of believers in the Bible doctrines held by S. D. Adventists, located at Sigourney, Iowa, convened in their church house, April 1, 1878, at 10 o’clock A. M.

After singing and prayer, Eld. D. M. Canright was called to the chair, and L. McCoy was chosen secretary.

The chairman stated the object of the meeting to be the organization of a church of Seventh-day Adventists, and requested those desiring to participate in the said organization to give their names to the secretary.

Whereupon the following named persons responded, to wit, L. McCoy, C. E. Moser, G. B. Starr, Rachel Buck, and Carrie Dalbey.

The chairman then asked each of this company if they had any objections to any one of the others, and there being no objection, he then asked them if they could freely and cheerfully fellowship one another. This being answered in the affirmative, they all, by a rising vote, united in the following covenant:—

“We hereby associate ourselves together, taking the name of Seventh-day Adventists, and covenanting to keep the commandments of God and the faith of Jesus.” This constituted them a church.

On motion of Bro. Starr, supported by Bro. Moser, Bro. L. McCoy was elected church clerk.

On motion of Bro. Moser, supported by Bro. Starr, the church adjourned to call of the chair. L. McCoy, Sec.

Sigourney, April 6, 1878, 9 A. M., the church convened for a business meeting, all the members having had notice of the same. Prayer by Bro. Starr.

On motion of Bro. McCoy, supported by sister Dalbey, sister Jessie P. Moser was received as a member of the church, subject to baptism.

Bro. Henry Nicola, bearing a letter of commendation from the church of S. D. Adventists at Richmond, Iowa, was, by motion of Bro. Starr, supported by Bro McCoy, duly received as a member of this church.

Bro. Asa Ruloff, a member of the Baptist church, having embraced our views, and desiring to be identified with our people, presented himself for membership. There being no objections.

On motion of Bro. Starr. supported by sister Buck, Bro. Ruloff was received.

On motion of Bro. Moser, supported by Bro. Nicola, the church adjourned to call of the chair. L. McCoy, Clerk.

Aug. 12, 1878, at 10 A.M., the church convened for business.

Meeting opened by singing and prayer, Eld. Canright in the chair.

Bro. C. E. Moser asked for a letter of commendation.

On motion of Bro. Asa Ruloff, supported by Bro. Starr, the clerk was instructed to give Bro. Moser a letter.

By unanimous vote of the church, all being present, Bro. H. Nicola was selected elder of the church, and was duly ordained as such by Eld. Canright.

Bro. McCoy at this meeting preferred charge against Bro. Asa Ruloff for immorality, alleging that Bro. R. had violated the fourth commandment, in that he had sold coal and otherwise permitted labor to be done in his mine on the Sabbath day, the third of August, 1878.

Bro. R. being present demanded an investigation, and the case was heard, Bro. R. having opportunity for defense.

On motion of Bro. Starr, supported by Bro. McCoy, Bro. R. was placed under censure by a unanimous vote of the church.

On motion, adjourned until 2 o’clock P. M.

Aug. 12, 1878, at 2 P. M., the church convened pursuant to adjournment, for the transaction of business, Eld. Nicola in the chair.

Bro. Starr presented resolutions expressive of the sorrow occasioned by the death of our beloved sister Jones, which occured on the 8th inst, who by her Christian deportment and faithfulness in the discharge of every duty, had won for herself a place in the hearts of all. Although her loss is a severe trial to this little band, yet we bow in meek submission to the will of Him who doeth all things well.

The resolutions were ordered placed upon the record, and a copy of same furnished to the bereaved family.

On motion of Bro. M., supported by Bro. B., the church adjourned.

L. McCoy, Clerk.

NOTE.—”Will the clerks of our churches please preserve the above article for reference? It gives the proper form of conducting and recording business meetings. Notice, (1.) The first thing to do in making a record of a meeting is to give the date, thus: April 1, 1878, 10 A. M.; or July 5, 1878, 2 P. M.; (2.) if a vote is taken upon any question, the clerk should state who made the motion and who seconded it, as it is sometimes very important to know; (3.) The clerk should always sign his name at the close of the record of each meeting.
If further instruction is desired, it will be given any time.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH18780509-V51-19/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=7

Notes by Newsman777:

This 1878 document:

1) Demonstrates secretary procedure of that era.
2) Illustrates role playing as an effective teaching method.
3) Provides leadership to the many church clerks.
4) Illustrates the role of a teaching institute.
5) Provides examples both of joining by baptism and by profession of faith.
6) Cites only two doctrinal points upon which the church formed.

A Camp Meeting In Canada – Early 1840’s

April 4, 2008

May 8, 1856

THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF ADVENTISM

Immediately after the anniversary meetings (1842?) were over, the writer started for Canada East, to fulfill an engagement in Stanstead. He left Boston on Monday morning, and arrived at Stanstead, and began his meeting on Wednesday. The interest steadily increased from the beginning, and before two weeks were passed, the country, for thirty or forty miles around, was awake to the subject of the Lord’s coming. Immense concourses assembled, both in Canada and in Derby, Vermont, where a course of lectures was given. Such was the interest to hear, an the awakening among the people, that it was determined at once to hold a camp-meeting in Canada In accordance with this determination, a place was selected, the ground prepared, and the meeting held in the township of Hadley, Canada East. Such was the good effect of this first meeting, that the people of Bolton wished one to be held in their town. This was begun the next week after the Hadley meeting closed, and ended on the third of July. During thai month s labor, as near as could be estimated, five 01 six hundred souls were converted to God.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH1856-V08-04/index.djvu?djvuopts&page=1