Archive for the ‘Indonesia’ Category

History of Adventist Work in Indonesia

March 14, 2009

Our Adventist History Library at Covenant Forum now has information about the early work of the church in Indonesia. Use this link *here* to access it.

We recommend that people especially study the writings and work of R.W. Munson and E.H. Gates.


The Adventist Church in Indonesia, a Time Line

March 8, 2009

This post is in its beginning stages. Our Covenant Forum site lends itself to extensive posts on this same topic. You can find more information there. Click here.

Indonesia, A Chronology

R. W. Munson opened a home for orphans in Singapore.

November 11, R. W. Munson leaves New York for Padang, Sumatra to work among the Chinese there. They meet Tay Hong Siang, one of the first three boys to be admitted to the Singapore orphanage, now working in Padang. Tay and his wife and baby come to live and work with the Munson family. Tay has already found one Chinese man was has accepted the Gospel and has already begun keeping the Sabbath.

Munson begins an English language school in Padang. He calls it a mission school, “pure and simple”.
December 1, The Australasian Union Record presents a major mission study of what was then called Malaysia by R. W. Munson

E.H. Gates visits with Munson. They travel to Deli, Penang, and other places. They seek to extend the work.

Pastor G. F. Jones and wife and
Brother R. A. Caldwell sail for the East Indies to open a mission in Singapore.

Brother and Sister E. C. Davey to Singapore as medical missionaries.

In February, Brother F. Parkin reached Singapore; an evangelical canvasser.

In the Dutch East Indies, to proselyte among the Mohammedans is forbidden by law; but there is no law to forbid the circulation of religious literature.

R. W. Munson returns to Java from Australia as a translator at Soekaboemi
Miss Janz gives “to us oversight of her little colony of two hundred persons.”

The Malay Messenger of Truth Begins

The first baptism in Java

The first SDA Church organized on Java

Tha Malaysian Union Mission organized, included: Sumatra and East and West Java

Samuel Rantung’s work leads to a church organazed in the Celebes.

People from the Lake Toba region request instruction in the Bible. Some already keeping the Sabbath.

Petition sent to Batavia requesting Religious Liberty for Central Sumatra. (Kime)

Territory organized as the Netherlands East Indies Union Mission with 1700 members and 48 churches and companies.
West Java Mission, H. Eelsing reports.
22 Sabbath Schools, 698 members
7 Church Schools, 650 students
Central Sumatra (Batakland) Youngberg reports on work of Kime.
Sister Kime very sick, they are on leave.
School and Medical Work
January 1929, Religious Liberty granted to Kime’s work.

Dutch Government inters all Germans missionaries.

Church Membership reaches 10 000

Chruch Membership reaches 20 000

Inodnesia divided into East Indonesian Union Conference and West Indonesian Union Mission;
part of the Southern Asia-Pacific Division
1100 Churches
200 000 members


Land, G (2005). Historical Dictionary of Seventh-day Adventists: Historical Dictionaries of Religions Philosophies, and Movements, No. 56. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0810853450, 9780810853454. 419 pages. Available as a Google Book ***Here***

Australasian Union Record
Asiatic Division Outlook