Archive for the ‘Illustrations’ Category

Whiter Than Snow, 1880

February 17, 2009
WHEN a flippant unbeliever accosted an earnest
evangelical preacher with an objection to his ser-
mon, and said: “Sir, I don’t like your theology.
It is all blood, blood, BLOOD! It savors of the
shambles. I like a pleasanter gospel.” The am-
bassador of Christ replied: “True, my theology
is bloody. It recognizes as its foundation the
death of Christ, with the thorn-pierced brow,
bleeding hands and open side. I am quite con-
tent that it should be bloody; for God has said:
‘ Without shedding of blood,’ there is no remission
of sins; and, ‘The blood of Jesus Christ his Son
cleanseth us from all sin.’ “

“Scarlet” sins become “white as snow.” How?
“Not by works of righteousness which we have
done.” All the dyers on earth cannot dye a red
into white. And no human merit can avail or
cleanse one crimson spot of guilt away. “By the
washing of regeneration and renewing of the
Holy Ghost,” are we justified and sanctified,
“through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,
whom God had set forth to be a propitiation
through faith in his blood.”

Of the redeemed in glory we read, “they have
washed their robes and made them white in the
blood of the Lamb.” The livery in Heaven is
white. “Fine linen, clean and white,” “white
robes,” ” white horses;” ” a white cloud,” as the
seat of the Son of man; “a great white throne”
for the Judge; “a white stone ” for the accepted
saints, who “walk in white” with him who has
made them ” worthy.” Verily, we must wear our
“white raiment” here, if we would enter there.
” They are without fault before the throne of
God.” And ” Christ also loved the Church and
gave himself for it, that he might sanctify and
cleanse it—that he might present it to himself a
glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle, or
any such thing.”

To the Fountain opened for sin and uncleanness
let us daily draw near, and take with us the
words of “the snow-prayer.” As said a happy
little girl who came in one morning to her Chris-
tian mother’s knee, after a bright race in the crisp,
freshly-fallen snow, “Mamma, I could not help
pausing while I was at play, to pray the snow-
prayer.” “What did you pray, my dear? ” asked
the interested mother. The dear child replied,
“Mamma, I said to Jesus, ‘Wash me, and I shall
be whiter than snow.”

 “Helpless and foul as the trampled snow,
Sinner, despair not, Christ stoopeth low,
To rescue the soul that was lost in sin,
And raise it to life and enjoyment again;
Groaning, bleeding, dying for thee,
The Crucified hung on the accursed tree;
His accents of mercy fell soft on thine ear—
Is there mercy for me? will he heed my prayer?
O God, in the stream that for sinners doth flow,
Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.”

—Selected.

 The Signs of the Times, February 19, 1880 (a DjVu file)
Pacific Press Publishing Association, Oakland, Ca.
(James White, J.N. Andrews, and Uriah Smith cited as the editors)

Posted also at:

(click on –>) Covenant Forum’s Adventist History Library

Luther Prays for Melancthon, RH 1859

January 1, 2009

Review and Herald, January 6, 1859

luther-and-mel-rh-01-06-1859

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH18590106-V13-07/index.djvu

Fishers of Men

November 6, 2008

Union Conference Record, Australasian, November 23, 1908

Believing that Jesus is speaking to us as individuals in the verse quoted (Matt. 4: 19), let us read it as if addressed to each person separately : ” Follow Me, and I will make you a fisher of men.”

Now you would not consider yourself a fisherman if you always remained at home and sent your father or brother away with hook and line, or net, to do the actual work of catching fish. So another command comes to us from the Master:—

“Go ye out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in.”

It you are to be a fisher of men, you are to go where active service is to be done in winning them from sin to the love of Christ.

The genuine fisherman enjoys selecting the best fishing-rod and the finest reel ; he looks with pride upon his collection of tempting bait. But the keenest pleasure comes when he wades’ into the swift-flowing stream, casts the hook into the foaming water, and feels the tug of resistance as the bait is taken. There is a thrill of satisfaction as, with the skill of experience and careful study, he finally lands the finny captive upon the bank.

Meade MacGuire

Madman for Christ

November 6, 2008

Union Conference Record, Australasian, November 2, 1908

NEVER had any people such reason to be filled with a burning zeal for the salvation of sinners as we have who live to-day. It is said of Rowland Hill, that the people of his native village called him a madman. This was his defence : ” While I passed along yonder road, I saw a gravel-pit cave in, and bury three men alive. I hastened to the rescue, and shouted for help until they heard me in the town almost a mile away. Nobody called me a madman then. But when I see destruction about to fall on sinners and entomb them in an eternal mass of woe, and cry aloud if perchance they may behold their danger and escape, they say I am beside myself; perhaps I am, but O that all God’s children might thus be fired with desire to save their fellows!”

The position we occupy in the world demands of us a far different spirit from that which we manifest toward the perishing. We may well take to heart the rebuke of an infidel lawyer to a professed
Christian : ” Did I believe as you do, that the masses of our race are perishing in sin, I would have no rest. I would fly to tell them of salvation. I would labour day and night. I would speak with all the pathos I could summon. I would warn, expostulate, and entreat my fellow-men to turn to Christ and receive salvation at His hands. I am astonished at the manner in which the majority of you Christians tell your message. You do not act as if you believe your own words. You have not the earnestness in preaching that we lawyers have in pleading. If we were as tame as you are, we would never carry a single suit.”

Other References to this Illustration:

The Consignment of the Lost
Evangelical Christianity by Edward Heppenstall