Archive for the ‘Wm Arnold’ Category

Timeline, SDA Church in Trinidad

March 20, 2009

Adventist History Library (AHL) is currently developing a comprehensive timeline for the Adventist work in Trinidad. It can be found *HERE* at Covenant Forum’s AHL section.

1892, Chadwick Visits Trinidad and British Guiana

March 17, 2009

1892, Spring, L. C. Chadwick Reports

Review and Herald, June 21, 1892, p. 12

TRINIDAD AND BRITISH GUIANA

AFTER my last report, I spent a few days at Trinidad, Where “nothing has ever been done in the interests of the present truth, except that brother Arnold is now delivering large numbers of ”Great Controversy,” and the International Tract Society is commencing a correspondence, which is showing good results. This is a beautiful island, and one in which ministerial labor should soon be begun. As I visit these fields, and see the open doors before us on every hand, my heart goes out in prayer for our people to awaken to the responsibility that rests on us to support our foreign work, that we may extend it into all these islands and other countries toward which we have hardly turned our attention. There are about seventy thousand Hindus in Trinidad, or about one third of the population. Many of them have received a knowledge of the true God, and we should be doing something for them.

I spent twenty-two days in British Guiana, from April 27 to May 19. Five years ago Elder G. G. Rupert labored here two months, and brother Geo. King sold some books. A small church was organized. Last year brother Arnold sold several hundred books in the colony, which has a population of about three hundred thousand, of whom one third are Hindus. The church has struggled along under difficulties, among which has been a division in their own numbers; but in the face of all these, others have received the truth, and there has never been so widespread an interest to know more of the message, as there is at the present time.

My labors were bestowed chiefly upon the church and the believers. By the blessing of God, differences vanished, hearts were united, and I believe that much good was accomplished. I went out eighty-five miles in the country, held a few meetings, and baptized eight, and later sixteen were baptized in Georgetown, of whom three were Hindus. The church was strengthened, and I left it with a membership of forty-one. The officers were unanimously chosen, and we felt that the Lord sanctioned the service when the elder and deacons were set apart for their work, with prayer and laying on of hands. At the farewell service, we celebrated the ordinances, and it was a time of refreshing. If all continue to walk in unity and love, the influence of the cause may be greatly extended. This is an important field, and we should have one minister located in this colony, to develop the interest that now exists.

L. C. CHADWICK.

William Arnold, Pioneer Book Seller

March 17, 2009

William Arnold, Pioneer Book Seller, A Chronology

william-arnold-1890

1884
Served on the nominations committee for the first annual meeting of the Sanitarium Improvement Company. YB 1885, p. 66

TO AUSTRALIA

1885
The first party of Seventh-day Adventist missionaries, consisting of S. N. Haskell, J. 0. Corliss, M. C. Israel (ministers), W. Arnold (a colporteur from Michigan), and H. Scott (a printer),; landed in Australia. Melbourne was chosen as the first field, and it proved a fruitful one, for at the close of 1886 there was a church of one hundred members established. RH 1918, V95-31

J. O. Corliss’ wife and two children came as well; as did Israel’s wife and their two daughters. On May 10, they took passage on the ship Australia from San Francisco, and twenty-eight days later landed in Sydney, June 8. In about a month from then they were all settled in Richmond, Melbourne, and on July 4, 1885, they held their first Sabbath school, their membership being eleven persons, comprising workers and their families (as listed above). They met in Haskell’s rented house in Richmond, Victoria (AAR 1901-07 sp03, p. 13).

The original Minute book for this gathering “recorded the following: Superintendent, Pastor S. N. Haskell; secretary, Jane Israel. The lesson study was, ‘The Saints’ Inheritance,’ and ten were present as students. No offering was recorded.” AAR 1965-33, p.2.

In less than three weeks, on July 21, a mission was opened in the Temperance Hall, Richmond. A little later that year, with the mission work well begun in Australia, S. N. Haskell left for New Zealand. RH 1948-19, p. 16

“These laborers met with opposition from both the pulpit and press. They worked as best they could, visiting, holding Bible-readings, and selling books, Brother Arnold selling over 1000 copies of Daniel and Revelation in Melbourne in less than a year. Many tears were shed and prayers offered in connection with this first year’s work. ” AAR 1901-08, p. 10.

“With the first contingent of workers came also Brother H. 8cott, the printer of the party. It was in the bedroom of Brother Scott in Richmond that the first type was set up and it was then conveyed by handcart to the local press for the printing of our first literature in Australia.

“Quite a number of older brethren will remember the old Bible Echo printed at Best Street, North Fitzroy. The printing press for this paper was given by Brother Arnold, who gladly donated £250 earned by the sale of “Daniel and the Revelation…” AAR 1935-30, p. 11.

TO ENGLAND

1887
November 22, Tenth Meeting of the 1887 General Conference Session: “26. That Wm. Arnold, now in Australia, go to England to help in establishing the canvassing work there.” YB 1888, p. 41.

1888
In June, 1888, Bro. Wm. Arnold arrived from Australia, and spent a few weeks canvassing for “Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation.” His efforts were attended with marked success. The willingness to read on the subjects presented in the Bible readings which have been held, is continually increasing, and many families have become interested in different parts of the city. Several soldiers at the barracks at Southampton have embraced the truth principally by reading. YB 1891, p. 75
Noted as England’s first colporteur. TCOG, 1945-3, p.5
1889
April, May and June; Arnold “very successful” in London. YB 1891, p. 76

THE WEST INDIES

“The work in the West Indies was begun by Brother Wm. Arnold, in the winter of 1888-9. He visited and sold books on the islands of Santa Croix, Saint Kitts, Nevis, Antigua, Montseratt, and Barbadoes. He gave to the International Tract Society the addresses of 1,200 persons who had purchased ” Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation” from him, and the society began sending literature to them and corresponding with them. A number began to obey as the result of this work.

1890
On November 7, 1890, Elder Dexter A. Ball sailed to Barbadoes, in company with Brother Arnold. A gentleman owning a mission building in Bridgetown invited Elder Ball to hold meetings in his chapel, and fifty-seven discourses were preached. A number accepted the truth, and since then a church has been organized.

Saint Vincent was then visited by Elder Ball, and also Antigua. At the latter place, the work of a sister who had become acquainted with the truth in London, England, had led several to accept it. About sixty services were held here, and twenty-six persons joined the believers in the West Indies. – Saint Kitts and Santa Croix were also visited. At Montseratt, an open-air service was held, and a number of books were sold.

1891
“We have also been able to respond to the pressing calls from the West Indies by sending Elder D. A. Ball of the Pennsylvania Conference to labor in that field, and with him Wm. Arnold.” YB 1891, p. 46

“Elder Ball then revisited Saint Kitts, to make arrangements for Brother Charles D. Adamson to enter the work. While there, three persons signed the covenant, as the result of personal work. On the way to Barbadoes, a few days were spent at Dominica. Reaching Barbadoes, after a long absence, it was found that the brethren there were of good courage, and their numbers had been increased. Brother Adamson joined Elder Ball in the work there for about six weeks, when, they went to the island of Grenada. Here they found a number keeping the Sabbath as the result of a brother’s efforts, who had received the truth through reading a book which he had purchased in South America.

“Brother Wm. Arnold is still canvassing in the islands, with good success.” YB 1892, p. 74, 75

IN DEMERARA (GUYANA)

Arnold works in Demerara (Guyana); writes a descriptive letter home to his children.

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

He spends the summer in Trinidad to wait out Demerara’s rainy season.

1892
Arnold works the summer in Tobago.

THE MAGIC POCKET VAPORIZER

1904
Marketing the Magic Pocket Vaporizer, “because everybody wants it.”

I find little difficulty in getting recommendations from influential people, having secured haif a dozen testimonials from among the clergy of this city (Battle Creek). The canvasser needs but little capital in selling this instrument, as deliveries are made as fast as opportunity affords, and In this way he will find his influence constantly increasing. A splendid opportnnity is also afforded to do missionary work among the suffering, and the canvasser can make good wages besides.

I predict a large sale for the Magic Pocket
Vaporizer.” ALUG 1904-45, p.11

HOME IN NEW YORK STATE

1908
April 25-26, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold attend a meeting at West Valley, New York. “We were glad to see Brother and Sister Wm. Arnold present. Brother Arnold is not very strong physically, but his courage and hope in the Lord is strong. ” ALUG 1908-19, p. 4.

1910
Lives at Ellicottville, New York. W. B. White reports on his visit with Arnold. ALUG 1910-01, p. 2.

LIVES IN COLORADO

BACK TO NEW YORK

1917
Lived in Colorado for a time and now coming back to Ellicottville. ALUG 1917-22, p. 8.

WILLIAM ARNOLD DIES

1922
William Arnold dies. Survived by his wife and daughter, Mabel. ALUG 1922-25, p. 8.

1892, Colporteur Arnold Visits Tobago

March 17, 2009

Review and Herald, August 30, 1892, page 5

FROM ROBINSON CRUSOE’S ISLAND.

I FIRST landed at Tobago in April, and took about one hundred and sixty orders for books, and now I have returned to attend to delivering them. This island is at present under the same government as that of Trinidad, and is only one night’s sail from that place, by Royal Mail. Tobago is twenty-two miles long, eight miles broad, and is of volcanic formation, with a range of hills twenty miles long, rising to a hight of 1,800 feet. Since the decline in sugar, Tobago has not been in a prosperous condition, and I feel very well satisfied with even 160 orders. In Trinidad you will find large, well-cultivated estates, a railroad, telegraph, and street-car lines, but none of these are to be seen on Tobago. Carriage roads are very few here, and as a consequence, every one rides, and ladies go to parties, and even to church, in the saddle.

The early history of Tobago is a varied one, having been owned by the Spanish, Dutch, and French. I climbed up to the old Fort George, and sold books to the officers there. Perhaps two miles away could be seen the old earthworks where the French intrenched themselves on the top of a high hill, and took Fort George; but shortly after, the English fleet appeared, and the French were driven off the island, so that since 1814 Tobago has been an undisputed English colony.

A few miles away is “Robinson Crusoe’s cave,” which I should visit if business took me that way. As it is, I shall be content with a few curios from Robinson Crusoe’s Island.

The largest congregation here is that of the Moravians. I have sold some books to them and to their ministers, and, in fact, to all the ministers in the island. I have been working under difficulties for the last few months, as we have had the most rain this season of any in twenty years. This makes the rivers dangerous to ford, but when on foot, the man who carries my books carries me over the stream also.

In regard to my work thus far, I can report 2,000 books delivered in 18 1/2 months from the time I left Battle Creek, and a surplus of about five hundred and fifty orders besides. I had hoped to deliver that number by May 1, 1893, but I shall probably deliver 3,000 by that time.

W. ARNOLD.
Scarborough, Tobago, July 10.

http://www.adventistarchives.org/docs/RH/RH18920830-V69-35/index.djvu?djvuopts&p age=5
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Observations:

Arnold applies his comparative analysis skills. He effectively contrasts Trinidad and Tobago.

Of the 3000 orders, did anyone accept the Adventist message as a result?